War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0642 OPERATIONS IN N.VA.,W.VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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the cavalry in scouring the entire country around. It is my belief, so far as I was able to judge, that there was less disposition on the part of the men to shirk from duty, but on the contrary everything went to prove their willingness to do their utmost; the great mass seemed eager to confront the foe. The present system of provost guard, if carried into effect, will prevent all future straggling.

I have the honor, sir, to be, your most obedient servant,

D. B. BRIDGFORD,

Major and Chief Provost-Marshal, Second Corps.

Major A. S. PENDLETON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps.

P. S.-During the 13th there were 320 sent back, and on the 14th 206, making the number, as above stated, 526.

[Inclosure.]

List of prisoners captured at Fredericksburg by Lieutenant-General Jackson's corps.

Commissioned officers paroled....................... 11

Enlisted men........................................445

Enlisted men paroled................................133

Total...............................................589

Less 68 taken and sent by General Longstreet's

corps............................................... 68

Making the number taken.............................591

This is the number they were received here.

No. 307. Report of Major General Daniel H. Hill, C. S. Army, commanding D. H. Hill's division.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, December 24, 1862.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report the operations of my command around Fredericksburg.

On December 3, my division was sent to Port Royal, to prevent the crossing of the Yankees at or near that point. Four Yankee gunboats were then lying opposite the town. Rifle-pits were constructed above the town on the night of the 4th, to prevent the pirates from ascending, and Hardaway's Whitworth gun was placed on Jack's Hill, some 3 miles below the town, and his remaining two guns, with Carter's Parrotts, were placed on the hill due west of the town.

Hardaway opened upon the gunboats about 3 o'clock on the 5th instant. Finding the fire too hot for them, they fled back to town, where they were sheltered from Carter's fire. Hardaway continued to pelt them, and to stop his fire [as is supposed] the ruffians commenced shelling the town, full of women and children. The town was partially destroyed, but a merciful God kindly protected the inoffensive inhabitants. A dog was killed and a negro wounded; no other living being was injured. Finding that Hardaway's fire did not slacken, the pirates fled down the river; but now a worse fate awaited them than a distant cannonade: The gallant Major Pelham, of General Stuart's Horse Artillery, had a section of artillery immediately on the bank of the river,