War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0588 OPERATIONS IN N. VA.,W. VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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Numbers 273. Report of Captain E. Taliaferro, Ordnance Officer, McLaws' division.

HEADQUARTERS McLAWS' DIVISION, December 20, 1862.

MAJOR: I herewith transmit to you a report of the ordnance stores captured by this command in the recent battles around Fredericksburg:

Small-arms ............................................... 1,500

Rounds of small-arm ammunition ...........................200,000

Sets of accouterments .................................... 400

Knapsacks ................................................ 300

Cartridge-boxes (extra) .................................. 145

Rounds of 12-pounder shell and spherical case ............ 695

12-pounder shot .......................................... 120

Rounds of Parrott shell (different calibers) ............. 240

3-inch shell of various kinds ............................ 200

A considerable proportion of the shells which were collected in the streets and houses are somewhat damaged, but capable of being again rendered serviceable. The arms and accouterments are for the most part in good condition, and the small-arm ammunition uninjured.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. TALIAFERRO,

Captain and Ordnance Officer of Division.

Major JAMES M. GOGGIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 274. Report of Brigadier General Joseph B. Kershaw, C. S. Army, commanding Kershaw's brigade.

HEADQUARTERS KERSHAW'S BRIGADE, Near Fredericksburg, Va., December 26, 1862.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of my command during the recent engagement.

On the morning of the 11th instant, by daylight, the brigade was formed in line of battle in the position assigned me, the right resting at the left of Howison's Hill, and the left near Howison's Mill, on Hazel Run. Ordered during the morning to re-enforce the picket of General Barksdale, at Deep Run, the Fifteenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, Colonel De Saussure, was sent, but found the bridge at that point already completed, and perfectly commanded by the batteries on the other side. This regiment remained on picket until withdrawn to its former position, by order of the major-general commanding, on Friday morning, after a night of such intense cold as to cause the death of one man and disable, temporarily, others. With this exception, the troops were kept in position strengthening our defenses nightly without any incident requiring notice until Saturday, the 13th.

About 1 o'clock of that day I was directed to send two regiments into the city to the support of General Cobb, then engaged with part of his brigade at the foot of Marye's Hill, and having called for re-enforcements. I sent forward at once Colonel John D. Kennedy with his own (Second) regiment