War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0584 OPERATIONS IN N. VA.,W. VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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Return of casualties in McLaws' division at the battle of Fredericksburg-Continued.

Killed. Wounded.

Command. Officers Enlisted Officers Enlis-

. men. . ted men

Cobb's brigade:

Staff.

-------

-------

2 1

16th Georgia. 1 3 1 61

18th Georgia.

-------

11 2 45

24th Georgia. 1 4 4 27

Phillips' Legion. 1 12 6 49

Total. 3 30 15 183

Grand total. 10 90 51 641

CONTINUATION:

Captured

or missing.

Command. Officers Enlisted Aggre- Officers

. men. gate. killed.

Cobb's brigade:

Staff.

-------

-------

3 Brigadier

General T.

R. R. Cobb

mortally

wounded.

16th Georgia. 1 3 70 Lieutenant

J. S.

Bowring.

18th Georgia.

-------

-------

58

24th Georgia.

-------

-------

36 Captain

Walter S.

Brewster.

Phillips' Legion.

-------

-------

68 Lieutenant

Colonel R.

T. Cook.

Total. 1 3 235

Grand total. 2 64 858

Numbers 272. Report of Colonel Henry Coalter Cabell, Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS McLAWS' DIVISION, January 6, 1863.

I have the honor to forward herewith the report of Colonel Henry C. Cabell, chief of artillery of my division, concerning the conduct and services of the artillery under his charge during the recent engagements about Fredericksburg, and request that it be filed with my report.

Very respectfully,

L. McLAWS,

Major-General.

Major [G. MOXLEY] SORREL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP NEAR FREDERICKSBURG, VA., December 25, 1862.

MAJOR: In conformity with instructions, I have the honor to submit the following report of the conduct and services of the artillery placed under my command during the recent engagement:

The division of Major-General McLaws arriving here at the head of the column on Thursday, November 20, by a rapid movement to intercept the threatened advance of the enemy at Fredericksburg, it devolved upon me, under the direction of Major-General McLaws, to place the artillery in position and prepare for their attack. It had been represented that the hills of the Stafford side of the Rappahannock completely commanded the heights on this side. This was apparently the case on the first view of the position, the upper range of hills being then covered with forest. Anticipating that the enemy, who were in large force on the opposite side of the river, would immediately attempt to force the passage of the river, preparations were at once made for resistance. However, the enemy not attempting a passage then, in a very short time the whole scheme of defense was arranged.

About a mile above Fredericksburg, at Dr. John R. Taylor's residence, the land rises abruptly from the river to great elevation to the