War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0438 KY.,MID AND E. TENN.,N. ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXII.

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telegraphed General Pemberton this morning via Jackson, but have no reply. The march of Bragg's troops to Pemberton's present position would require several weeks.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

[DECEMBER 4, 1862.-For Pemberton to Bragg, see Series I, Vol. XVII, Part II, p. 778.]

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., December 4, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Can you give me General Pemberton's force, and that of the enemy; the direction in which he is moving, and where he is? Use the President's cipher of last spring.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE, December 4, 1862.

Lieutenant-General POLK,

Commanding Polk's Corps:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that two brigades from Major-General Cheatham's division be ready to move at an hour's notice, with three days' cooked rations. Ambulances and 10 wagons to a brigade will be allowed. Also that Hanson's brigade be ready with four days' rations; ambulances and wagons as above.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY BRIGADE, Nolensville, December 4, 1862.

Brigadier General JOSEPH WHEELER,

Chief of Cavalry, &c.:

GENERAL: The enemy returned to their camp last night. My pickets are at their usual stands. I send over a lieutenant-colonel, captured by one of Captain Blackburn's men, acting as a courier. Hear his account of the capture; it is interesting, and, I think, true. The man deserves the horse and saddle, if they are take from the colonel, and I hope he will get them. The enemy foraged very heavily on the Granny White, Hillsborough, Hardin, and Charlotte pikes yesterday. Why is not General Forrest, or some one else, ordered to Franklin?

Most respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

JNumbers A. WHARTON,

Brigadier Gen., Comdg. Cavalry, Polk's Corps, Army of Tennessee.

P. S.-I burned a fine lot of lumber, to prevent the enemy from rebuilding the bridge across Mill Creek, burned by orders. The lumber was in 100 feet of the burnt bridge. I think the lumber ought to be paid for. Let me know if I am right.