War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0207 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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the officer, whose headquarters they are intended to designate; and on the march will be carried near his person.

V. The quartermaster's department will take immediate measure to supply these flags upon requisitions approved by wing and division commanders, who will cause such requisitions to be made without delay.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

NASHVILLE, December 19, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT,

Cincinnati, Ohio:

Now is a good time to occupy Clarksville. Forrest goes toward Corinth. Would like to post Granger's force there, if your can replace him by good commander at Bowling Green, which is an important point.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 19, 1862.

Major-General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

Your telegram just received. Have written you to-day in regard to expedition, which is composed of 1,200 cavalry, under General Carter. It is to cross the mountains east of Cumberland Gap, and strike the road at Union and Watauga, at any rate, if practicable, dividing after crossing mountains, one portion moving toward Knoxville. Hope to destroy everything on road between Union and Knoxville, if nothing more. The route west of Cumberland Gap impracticable for want of forage, so scouts report. By the other, enough, can be had for expedition.

WRIGHT.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, December 19, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT,

Cincinnati:

I fear your expedition is too slight and feeble. They may make up in velocity for their small mass. Can't you send more?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, December 19, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

The force is not only all I can spare, but I have already weakened too much the cavalry on your line of communication. Don't know that I would make it stronger if I could, but with somewhat more than double the number it might be divided, as you suggested to-day. Granger has not, this moment, 500 mounted men left.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.