War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0613 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Original Records

HEADQUARTERS ARMISTEAD'S BRIGADE,

September 19, 1862.

General PENDLETON, Commanding:

GENERAL: In obedience to your request that I would keep you posted, I have the honor to state that Colonel Edmond, Thirty-eighth Virginia, reports that we have not a piece of artillery in position, firing., and the enemy have, as far as he could ascertain, twenty-odd. There is nothing to prevent the enemy from crossing except the line of sharpshooters on the river.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. GREGORY HODGES,

Colonel, Commanding Armistead's Brigade.

SEPTEMBER 20, 1862.

General PENDLETON,

Chief of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia:

SIR: I respectfully ask permission of you for Captain R. C. M. Page, of the Morris Artillery, to refit his battery from the captured ordnance stores at Harper's Ferry. I would also most earnestly request that he be allowed to exchange the guns he has for such improved guns as may be there. Captain Page's battery is almost entirely disabled from the prolonged and unequal contest it sustained against the batteries of the enemy, superior in number and kind of guns. Captain Page's service in the action of yesterday entitles him to the best guns and the be equipments.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. P. JONES,

Major, Commanding Battalion Reserve Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

September 21, 1862.

Major B. G. BALDWIN,

In Charge of Ordnance Department, Winchester, Va.:

MAJOR: The commanding general desires me to write advising you of his anxiety that you should adopt the most energetic measures to put your department at Winchester into a state of the greatest efficiency as speedily as possible, and some solicitude is felt about this matter of ammunition. He is particularly anxious that four 24-pounder Parrot guns captured at Harper's Ferry may be sent forward if ammunition of a suitable character can be obtained, as the enemy have been pushed back wherever our guns have reached them, and they rely greatly upon their long-range artillery, in which they have greatly the advantage over us. It is hoped that this may be found among that taken at Harper' Ferry, probably overlook; otherwise, if to be procured from Richmond, he wishes it brought up immediately. He has also advised Department at Richmond that he wishes two-thirds of the ammunition forwarded to be lon-range or for the rifled pieces.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHILTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.