War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0602 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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and imprisoned upon no charge and contrary to all forms of law. The faithful and manly protest against this outrage made by the venerable and illustrious Marylander, to whom in better days no citizen appealed for right in vain, was treated with scorn and contempt; the government of your chief city has been usurped by armed strangers; your legislature has been dissolved by the unlawful arrest of its members; freedom of the press and of speech has been suppressed; words have been declared offenses by an arbitrary decree of the Federal Executive, and citizens ordered to be tried by a military commission for what they may dare to speak. Believing that the people of Maryland possessed a spirit too lofty to submit to such a government, the people of the South have long wished to aid you in throwing off this foreign yoke, to enable you again to enjoy the inalienable rights of freemen, and restore independence and sovereignty to your State. In obedience to this wish, our army has come among you, and is prepared to assist you with the power of its arms in regaining the rights of which you have been despoiled.

This, citizens of Maryland, is our mission, so far as you are concerned. No constraint upon your free will is intended; no intimidation will be allowed within the limit of this army, at least. Marylanders shall once more enjoy their ancient freedom of thought and speech. We know no enemies among you, and will protect all, of every opinion. It is for you to decide your destiny freely and without constraint. This army will resect your choice, whatever it may be; and while the Southern people will rejoice to welcome you to your natural position among them, they will only welcome you when you come of your own free will.

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Near Fredericktown, Md., September 9, 1862.

His Excellency President DAVIS, Richmond, Va.:

Mr. PRESIDENT: Nothing of interest, in a military point of view, has transpired since my last communication. We are able to obtain forage for our animals and some provisions, but there is more difficulty about the latter. Many of the farmers have not yet gotten out their wheat, and there is a reluctance on the part of millers and others to commit themselves in our favor. I shall now open our communication with the valley, so that we can obtain more supplies. Some cattle, but not in any great numbers, are obtain more supplies. Some cattle, but not in any great numbers, reobtained in this country. The inhabitants are said to have driven many off to Pennsylvania.

From reports that have reached me, I believe that the enemy are pushing a strong column up the Potomac River by Rockville and Darnestown, and by Poolesville toward Seneca Mills. I hear that the commands of Sumner, Sigel, Burnside, and Hooker are advancing in the direction above mentioned.

I have the honor to be, with high respect, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Near Fredericktown, Md., September 9, 1862.

His Excellency President DAVIS:

Mr. PRESIDENT: I have just received your letter of the 7th instant, from Rapidan, informing me of you intention to come on to Leesburg.