War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0908 Chapter XXIV. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD.

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quests that you will not advance your pickets until you hear further from him.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. PENDLETON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

Major-General JACKSON:

The enemy have had a scout of 20 near the bridge this morning at Port Republic. On our approach they fell back. We pursued them but did not see the scout at all. After passing General Lewis' about 2 miles we found ourselves in front of a regiment of cavalry. They are now just below General Lewis'.

E. SIPE,

Captain, Commanding Scout.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

June 8, 1862.

General THOMAS J. JACKSON,

Commanding Army in the Valley:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 6th [addressed to General Johnston] has been received. I congratulate you upon defeating and then avoiding your enemy. Your march to winchester has been of great advantage, and has been conducted with your accustomed skill and boldness. i hope you will be able to rest and refresh your troops for a few days before compelled to enter upon active service. I desire you to report the probable intentions of the enemy and what steps you can take to thwart them. Should there be nothing requiring your attention in the valley so as to prevent your leaving it for a few days, and you can make arrangements to deceive the enemy and impress him with the idea of your presence, please let me know, that you may unite at the decisive moment with the army near Richmond. Make your arrangements accordingly, but should an opportunity occur for striking the enemy a successful blow do not let it escape you.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

HEADQUARTERS VALLEY DISTRICT,

June 10, 1862.

Colonel MUNFORD, Commanding Cavalry:

COLONEL: Major-General Jackson directs that you will organize as many of the dismounted men as may be necessary to guard 400 prisoners, under a discreet and diligent officer, to conduct all the prisoners captured in the battles of June 8 and 9 on foot toward their place of destination. You will instruct the commander of this detachment not to move the prisoners till those still in the rear are brought up and a complete list is made out for these headquarters, containing the name, rank company, and regiment of all the prisoners. You will further instruct this commander that the destination of these prisoners is to be Salisbury, N. C., to be reached via Lynchburg and Danville. You will also