War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0855 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., April 18, 1862.

Major General THOMAS J. JACKSON,

Commanding, &c., near Mount Jackson, Va.:

GENERAL: I am directed by General Lee to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th instant,* respecting the attempted insurrection in your neighborhood, and reporting that the insurgents had been dispersed by a detachment from your command. He desires me to convey to you an expression of his gratification at your prompt and efficient action in this matter, and of his pleasure in witnessing the heroic and determined conduct of your command throughout, for which it has justly become renowned.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., April 18, 1862.

Brigadier General HENRY HETH,

Commanding, &c., Lewisburg, Va.:

GENERAL: The report of the strength of the enemy in Shenandoah Valley renders it probable that he may succeed in occupying Staunton. Your communication by that route will in that event be cut, and you must rely on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. It will depend upon the ability of the enemy and his further movements whether you may not be obliged to fall back toward Lynchburg. In that event you must endeavor to hold the passage of the Blue Ridge. To this end have your army in a movable condition, and keep in communication with General Edward Johnson, who, if compelled, will retire through Waynesborough to the Blue Ridge. All surplus ammunition and stores should be sent to Lynchburg, the movements of the enemy carefully watched, and every preparation made to make your army effective and formidable. You must also keep General H. Marshall advised of your movements and of the necessities which govern them, who, under similar contingencies, will move to Abingdon, and, if unable to form a junction with you, will retire east of the Blue Ridge into North Carolina, probably through Taylorsville. Should you have any suggestions to make as to the proposed movements under the necessity supposed, I shall be pleased to receive them.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., April 19, 1862.

Brigadier General C. W. FIELD,

Commanding, &c., Fredericksburg, Va.:

GENERAL: I have just received your letter dated at 7 a. m.+ this morning, with it inclosures. I think the force opposed to you is simply the brigade mentioned in one of the papers and corroborated by the letter of General Ewell. There can be no truth in the number

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*Not found.

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+Probably that on p. 432, Part I.