War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0476 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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WASHINGTON, July 16, 1862.

Major-General BANKS,

near Warrenton:

Send word to Hatch that no time should be lost in his movement; to be particular to destroy the Virginia Central east and west of Gordonsville. If he meets no considerable resistance at Charlottesville, to push a cavalry force down to James River, only 21 miles, and destroy the canal. I spoke to the President this morning, and he assures me that if Hatch accomplishers this, which he can easily do if he will only move quickly, his promotion will be made; urge him forward. If he is successful, the access to Shenandoah Valley is closed and our future operations greatly simplified.

Bayard goes at once to Culpeper with all McDowell's cavalry. Use him as you please, but always far to the front.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

WARRENTON, VA., July 16, 1862.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

A dispatch from General Hatch, dated 15th, this moment received. He says if I will place on regiment at Rixeyville by sunset the 16th he will have Charlottesville by Saturday. Two good regiment were sent him the 14th, and must have arrived there yesterday. There is nothing, therefore, to check his enterprise. He reports only small bands of guerrillas in the neighborhood.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

WARRENTON, VA., July 16, 1862.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

General Hatch reports that the two regiments haves reached him. He occupies Rapidan to-night; to-morrow Gordonsville. Rumor, he says, reports Jackson at Charlottesville, with large force.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.

NEAR WARRENTON, VA., July 16, 1862-5.35 p. m.

Major-General POPE,

[Commanding Army of Virginia]:

Your dispatch 4 p. m. just recesived. Five p. m. dispatch from General Hatch, who has received my dispatches, and says: "I will act as soon as possible."

He is much enjoyed by reports of large body of infantry on his left flank. His scouts do not find them, and he thinks they may be our troops on the railroad. We hear of no force in that direction.

I shall send express to-night and insist on immediate action.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.