War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0434 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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King's division and thence to march (a four days' march, or five at most) by way of Bowling Green across the Mattapony and Pamunkey.

It took General McCall's division three weeks to get away by water from Fredericksburg.

Very respectfully, you obedient servant,

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SHENANDOAH,

June 26, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

General Williams' division, 4,554 men, all armed, and fourteen guns, is opposite Front Royal, guarding river west to Passage Creed. Sigel's division, 5,500 men and twenty guns, on east side Strasburg turnpike, guarding river east toward Passage Crekk. Hatch's cavalry, 900, is on Strasburg pike, with detachments on Shenandoah at Snicker's and Berry's Ferries. Geary and 1,200 men near Snicker's Ferry, en route for me. Total, including Geary, 12,050. Major-General Fremont's effective force, supposed to be 12,000, it west of Strasburg turnpike. Troops can be put in marching order in two days. Will telegraph more definitely to-morrow of condition.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT,

June 26, 1862-1 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your dispatch of 25th instant, 11 p. m., received at 12.20 a. m. My exact force, including General Milroys' brigade, is 12,000-three in position on Cedar Creek to the right of General Sigel, and a division with General Milroy's brigade. Banks' advance at Strasburg. The number is increasing daily by return convalescents and detachments which are called in from every direction. The troops need two days' rest and wholesome food, which is now on hand, to be in marching order.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

MIDDLETOWN, June 26, 1862-1 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

In answer to your previous dispatches, I have no positive knowledge of the whereabouts of Jackson's forces, but rumors from different sources seem to indicate a movement from Woodstock over Great North Mountain and down the valley of the Cacapon, with the view of turning our position and attacking Winchester in our rear from the west.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.