War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0543 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS, DEPT. OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

Numbers 116. Richmond, May 24, 1862.

Brigadier General Samuel Garland will report to Major General D. H. Hill for assignment to the brigade lately commanded by Brigadier-General Early.

By command of General Johnston:

A. P. MASON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Harrison's, May 25, 1862.

General LEE:

GENERAL: The importance to the army of the appointment of several more general officers induces me to address you on the subject to-day. I hope in a day or two that Brigadier-General Anderson's command will be united to that of Brigadier-General Branch. This important force (important to us both from numbers and position) should be commanded by an able soldier, having adequate rank. A brigadier-general assigned to that command would neither exercise it with the same confidence nor be as readily and cheerfully obeyed as if the were first promoted; such an assignment would also give great dissatisfaction to the brigadier-generals now with those troops and to their friends.

The good of the service, in my opinion, requires the promotion of the officers already recommended by me for promotion to the grade of major-general.

I have been informed that Colonel Hampton has declined the promotion offered him. This makes Colonel Ewell's appointment legal, I presume.

I respectfully suggest that Colonel Reall, of the "Marine Corps," is eminently qualified for the grade of brigadier-general.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

May 25, 1862-10 a. m.

General L. O'B. BRANCH:

GENERAL: I have just received your letter dated yesterday, with a postscript of this morning.

In selecting your position consider the protection of the railroad, so far as it can be done without endangering your connection the army.

Have all crossing places of the Chickahominy examined, and learn all routes leading to your positions, as well as those from them to the main body.

It would be well to shift your place every day, if it can be done without disadvantage in respect to your principal objects.

General Anderson's troops will soon be at the Hanover Junction-in a day or two, that is to say. Let him know your position on his arrival.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

I send a letter to General Anderson, which you will oblige me by having forwarded to him beyond Hanover Junction, if it can safely be done; not otherwise.