War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0413 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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with pikes, and any muskets there may be to spare placed in the hands of the new troops.

He cannot vouch for the accuracy of his information, and only wishes to call your attention to the importance of rendering every musket serviceable.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., March 31, 1862.

Major General J. B. MAGRUDER,

Commanding Army of the Peninsula:

GENERAL: In reply to your requisition of the 29th instant for 1,000,000 of musket cartridges, I have to state that the Ordnance Department is able to forward to you this morning 60,000 cartridges of various calibers. There is a large demand for cartridges for Knoxville and Goldsborough, as well as for your department; and I am informed that as fast as the cartridges are turned out, which is about at the rate of 70,000 per day, the will be distributed to the above-named points in proportion to the requisitions from each. Goldsborough is pretty well supplied now, so that you will share chiefly in the distribution with Knoxville. The Chief of Ordnance is also under the impression that your supplies since November last have been sufficient to make up the waste in the stock in your hands previous to that date.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., March 31, 1862.

Major General J. B. MAGRUDER,

Commanding Department, Yorktown, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge your telegram asking that Ramseur's battery be sent you. There is already under your command on the Peninsula double the amount of the artillery in the Department of Norfolk.

It was not intended that General Colston should cross the river unless there was positive evidence of an attack against you in force. The instructions were to this effect; not was in contemplated that Ramseur's battery or the cavalry should accompany him until it was ascertained that no attack was threatened on Norfolk.

From present indications I think that Norfolk is quite as seriously threatened as the Peninsula, and more probably the object of attack. Should the latter prove the case, it is expected, as intimated to you by letter on 26th instant, that you will render all the assistance in your power compatible with the security of your own line.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.