War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0979 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Original Records

companies from Tappahannock, and any companies collected in the adjoining counties may be used for the same end. Should you be able to spare a couple of field pieces, they would add very much to the protection of the battery, until its construction might be completed. They could then be withdrawn. Colonel Talcott will take Fredericksbrug in his route, to concert with you the necessary measures. I hope you will give him all the facilities in your power.

Respectfully,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE FORCES,

Richmond, Va., July 15, 1861.

Colonel C. Q. TOMPKINS, Virginia Volunteers, Charleston, Va.:

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 6th instant, I am directed to inform you that the requisitions of Brigadier-General Wise for a large supply of ammunition have been approved and sent to the Ordnance Department. From him you will receive such amounts of powder and flints as you may require. On the return of Governor Letcher to this city the subject of the appointment of officers, to which you refer, will be immediately taken up.

Respectfully,

GEO. DEAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE FORCES,

Richmond, Va., July 16, 1861.

Brigadier General J. B. MAGRUDER, Commanding, Yorktown, Va.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 13th, in reference to the defenses on Jamestown Island, has been received. I hope the additional redoubt which you have directed to be constructed at the east end of the island and the division of th guns in the midway redoubt may be advantageous. I do not consider it advisable, however, to diffuse your force over too large a space, and it was this consideration that induced the location of the midway redoubt on its present site. I have only to repeat, in relation to the landing at Spratley's, King's Mill, &c., that the construction of the battery at Day's Point and the projected batteries at Mulberry Point, and the one opposite, will render them more secure, and diminish the danger of an attempt upon Williamsburg by that route. No means, however, must be neglected to prevent such an attempt or to secure the line of defenses across the Peninsula. We have not, however, guns sufficient to place at every vulnerable point on the Peninsula, and they must be posted only on the most important, and, if carried, the guns must be removed to other points of defense. Upon the completion of the defenses a more advantageous disposition of the guns may be made; but until that time I do not wish the guns for the defense of the channel to be removed from their present positions.

Respectfully,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.