War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0884 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA.

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at Winchester camp equipage for those companies said to be in want, and that arrangements might be made there for making cartridge-boxes, haversacks, &c.

Very respectfully, your obedient,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS VIRGINIA FORCES,

Richmond, Va., May 27, 1861.

Colonel GEORGE A. PORTERFIELD,

Commanding, &c., Grafton, Va.:

SIR: I have to inform you that I have ordered one thousand muskets, with a sufficient supply of powder and lead, to Beverly, escorted by Colonel Heck and Major Cowan. Any instructions you may have for Colonel Heck, address to him at Beverly. Colonel Heck has been instructed to call out all the volunteers that he can along his route.

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS VIRGINIA FORCES,

Richmond, Va., May 27, 1861.

Captain E. RUFFIN, JR.,

Virginia Volunteers:

SIR: You will proceed with the company under your command to Burwell's Bay, to watch the movements of the enemy, in order to give notice of his approach, should he land in that vicinity and attempt to penetrate towards the railroad. In that case you will immediately dispatch messengers to Suffolk and to Zuni, where the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad crosses the Blackwater. You will then keep in front of the enemy, to observe his motions and retard his advance. Should it be necessary to communicate with you, such communications will be sent through the Smithfield post-office.

Very respectfully,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

P. S.-Upon your arrival at Burwell's Bay you will inform the officer commanding at Zuni, in order that you may act in concert.

HEADQUARTERS,

Yorktown, Va., May 27, 1861.

Colonel GARNETT,

Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have just received, by a special messenger from Major Cary, the following dispatch: "The enemy are landing at Newport News. Five steamers are up James River. Destination unknown. Please send down cavalry immediately." I have not a single horseman, and cannot get one. A large force of cavalry, as I have stated before, seems to me to be absolutely necessary, to learn of the movements of the enemy. Major Cary is falling back with only thirty-five men, the rest of the troops being engaged in removing their families. The five steamers are reported by the express as being filled with troops. I am of the impression that this is intended to be an attack on our flanks.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER,

Colonel, Commanding.