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any puissance to fight with them or not. Also there was another point contrary to the duke of Lancaster, yet he had great joy of that viage, for generally all the commonty of England more inclined to be with the bishop of Norwich than to go with the duke of Lancaster: for a long season the duke was not in the grace of the people; and also they thought the realm of France to be [a) nearer journey than into Spain ; and also some said that the duke of Lancaster for covetousness of the silver and gold that was gathered of the Church and of the pardons, whereof he should have his part, that he did incline rather thereto for the profit than for any devotion. But they said how the bishop of Norwich represented the pope and was by him instituted, whereby the greatest part of England gave to him great faith, and the king also. And so there was ordained at the wages of the Church to go with this bishop Henry Spenser, divers good knights and squires of England and of Gascoyne, as the lord Beaumont, sir Hugh Calverley, sir Thomas Trivet, sir William Helmon, sir John Ferrers, sir Hugh Spenser, cousin to the bishop, son to his brother, sir William Faringdon, sir Matthew Redman, captain of Berwick ; all these were of England: and of Gascons there was the lord of Chateauneuf and sir John his brother, Raymond Marsan, Guillonet de Pans, Garriot Vigier, John de Caucbitan and divers other, and all counted they were a five hundred spears and fifteen hundred of other men, and a great number of priests, because the matter touched the Church and moved by the pope. These men of war provided themselves for the matter, and passage was delivered them at Dover and at Sandwich, and this was about Easter ; and so they passed over little and little, as they list : this voyage was in the manner of a croisey. Thus they passed the sea, or the bishop and other captains were fully ready; for the bishop and sir Hugh Calverley, sir Thomas Trivet and sir William Helmon were with the king and his council, and there they sware solemnly in the king's presence to bring truly to an end their voyage, nor to fight against no man nor country that held with pope Urban, but to fight and make war against them that were of the opinion of Clement. Thus they sware, and then the king by the advice of his council said to them : ` Sir bishop and all ye, when ye come to Calais, I will ye sojourn there in that frontier the space of a month, and in that term I shall refresh you with new men of war, of arms and archers, and I shall send you a good marshal, a valiant man, sir William Beauchamp; for I have sent for him, he is in the march of Scotland, whereas he keepeth frontier against the Scots, for the truce between the Scots and us falleth now at Saint John's tide: and after his return ye shall have him in your company without any fail. Therefore I would ye should tarry for him, for he shall be to you right necessary both for his wisdom and good counsel.' The bishop and his company promised the king so to do, and thus they departed from the king and took the sea at Dover and arrived at Calais the twenty-third day of April, the year of our Lord God a thousand three hundred fourscore and three. The same season there was captain at Calais sir John Devereux, who received the bishop and his company with great joy ; and so they landed little and little, and all their horses and baggage, and so lodged in Calais and thereabout in bastides that they made daily : and so there they tarried till the fourth day of May, abiding for their marshal sir William Beauchamp, who came not of all that time. When the bishop of Norwich, who was young and courageous and desirous to be in arms, for he never bare armour before but in Lombardy with his brother, thus as he was at Calais and saw how he was captain of so many men of arms, he said one day to his company `Sirs, why do we sojourn here so long and tarry for sir William Beauchamp, who cometh not? The king nor his uncles, I trow, think little of us: let us do some deeds of arms, sith we be ordained so to do let us employ the money of the Church trul



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