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of Gaunt, and the clerk that procureth to be bishop of Gaunt, all these are still behind in England to perform this alliance and, sir, ye shall hear more truer tidings than we can tell you, or the mid of May be past.' The earl of Flanders believed well all these sayings to be true, and so they were indeed. Then he began to imagine against this John Salemon and on the Englishmen dwelling in Bruges. Then he caused them to be summoned to be at a certain day assigned before the earl at Lille ; and so the earl's servants came and summoned John Salemon and divers other rich Englishmen, or they were ware thereof, commanding them the fifteenth day after to be with the earl at his castle of Lille. When the Englishmen heard thereof, they were sore abashed and took counsel together, having great marvel why the earl should send for them. All things considered, they doubted greatly, for they knew well the earl was fierce and fell in his haste. Then they said among themselves : ` He that keepeth not his body, keepeth nothing : we doubt lest the earl be informed sore against us ; for with Francis Ackerman, who bath a pension of the king of England, when he was in England there was with him two burgesses of this town of Bruges, and peradventure they have made some information against us to the earl, for as now they be on his part.' So on this purpose rested the Englishmen, that they durst not abide the earl's judgment nor to go to Lille at the day before limited: so they departed from Bruges and went to Sluys and did so much that they found a ship ready apparelled, and so they bought it with their money and so departed and sailed till they arrived at London. And when the earl of Flanders was informed of this matter and saw that the Englishmen appeared not at their day, he was sore displeased and sent incontinent to Bruges and caused to be seized all that ever could be found pertaining to the Englishmen, and all their heritages given and sold, and John Salemon clean banished out of Flanders for a hundred year and one day, and his companions; and such as were taken were put in prison, whereas some died and some recovered again all that ever they had lost. There is a common proverb, the which is true, and that is how envy never dieth. I say it because Englishmen are right envious of the wealth of other, and always bath been. It was so that the king of England and his uncles and the nobles of England were right sore displeased of the wealth and honour that was fallen to the French king and to the nobles of France at the battle of Rosebeque. And the knights of England spake and said to each other: ` Ah, Saint Mary, how the Frenchmen are now mounted in pride by the overthrowing of a sort of rude villains. Would to God Philip d'Arteveld had had of our men a two thousand spears and six thousand archers: there had not then scaped one Frenchman, but other slain or taken but an God will, this glory shall not long endure them. Now we have a fair advantage to enter into Flanders, for the country is now conquered for the French king, and we trust to conquer it again for the king of England. It sheweth well at this time that the earl of Flanders is greatly subject to the French king and that he will please him in all points, when our merchants dwelling in Bruges, and have dwelt there beyond this thirty year, be now banished and chased out of Flanders. The time bath been seen they durst not have done it ; but now they dare do none otherwise for fear of the Frenchmen: we trust it shall not abide long in this point.' This was the language among the Englishmen through the realm of England ; therefore it was to be supposed that this was done but by envy. In this season he that wrote himself pope Urban the sixth came by the sea from Rome to Genes, whereas he was well received and reverently of the Genoways, and there he kept his residence. Ye know well how all England was obeisant to him, as well the Church as the people, because the French king was Clementine, and all France. This Urban, on whom the Englishmen and divers other countries believed, he being



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