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same point as they be in now, when the king went into Flanders, then had they done well; but they had no mind so to do, they rather prayed to God that we should never return again.' The which words divers that were there helped well forward to the intent to grieve the Parisians, saying , If the king be well counselled, he shall not adventure himself to come among such people as cometh against him with an army arranged in battle. They should rather have come humbly with procession and have rung all the bells in Paris in thanking God of the victory that the king had in Flanders.' Thus the lords were abashed how they should maintain themselves. Finally it was appointed that the constable of France, the lord d'Albret, the lord of Coucy, sir Guy of Tremouille and sir John of Vienne should go and speak with them and demand of them the cause why they be issued out of Paris in so great a number armed in order of battle against the king ; the which thing was never seen before in France: and upon their answer the lords said the king should take advice:' they were wise enough to order as great a matter as that was and greater. So these said lords departed from the king without harness, and for the more surety of their business they took with them three or four heralds and sent them somewhat before to the Parisians, and said: ` Sirs, go ye on before to yonder people of Paris, and demand of them a safe-conduct for us to go and come, till we have spoken with them from the king.' These heralds departed and rode a great pace and came to these people ; and when the Parisians saw them coming, they thought full little they had come to have spoken with them, they thought they had but ridden to Paris as other did. The heralds had on their coat armours, and when they approached near to the Parisians, they said on high: `Where be the masters? Where be the rulers? Which of you be captains? We be come to you sent from the lords.' Then some of them of Paris perceived well by these words that they had not done well: they cast down their heads and said `Here be no masters: we are all of one accord and at the king's commandment and the lords'. Therefore, sirs, say in God's 1 `These lords were counselled to reply and speak.' name what ye will to us.' ` Sirs,' quoth the heralds, `the lords that sent us hither,' and named them, `they know not what ye think or intend : they require you that they may peaceably without peril come and speak with you, and return again to the king and shew him the answer that ye make to them: otherwise they dare not come to you.' ` By our faiths, sirs,' quoth they, `they ought to say no such words to us but of their gentleness:' we think ye do but mock us.' `Surely, sirs,' quoth the heralds, `we speak it in good certainty.' ' Then,' quoth the Parisians, `go your way and say to them that they may come at their pleasure to us without danger or peril; for they shall have no hurt for none of us, for we are all ready to fulfil their commandments.' Then the heralds returned to the lords and shewed them as ye have heard. Then the four lords rode forth and their company, and came to the Parisians, whom they found in good array and order of battle, and there were more than twenty thousand malles. And as the lords passed by them and beheld them well, within themselves they praised much their manner ; and also as they passed by, ever the Parisians inclined themselves to them. And when these lords were as in the midst among them, then they rested and stood still, and the constable spake a-high and said : ' Ye people of Paris, what bath moved you to issue out of the city in this order of battle? It seemeth ye will fight against the king our sovereign lord, whose subjects ye be or should be.' ` Sir,' quoth they, `save your grace, we were never of will to do anything against the king ; but, sir, we be issued out for none other cause but to shew the king what puissance the Parisians be of. The king is but young, he never as yet saw it ; and without he see it he cannot know it, nor how he may be served, if need be.' ` Sirs,' quoth the consta



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