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with the duke; and so the duke and his company came to Senlis, whereas the king was, and his two uncles with him, the dukes of Berry and of Bourbon, and so there the duke of Burgoyne was received with great joy and he was demanded tidings of Flanders and of the siege of Oudenarde, and the duke answered them right sagely and shewed all the matter. And when he saw his time, he took apart the duke of Berry and shewed him how the Gauntois full of pride had done their devoir and gain to destroy all nobleness, and also he sewed how they had brent and pilled on the realm of France, the which was a thing prejudicial and to the confusion and shame of the realm of France, saying how it ought not so to be suffered. `Fair brother,' quoth the duke of Berry, 'we will speak with the king in this matter we two are chief of his council, so that if we inform the king thereof, there is none shall say against our intents. Howbeit, to move war between France and Flanders, the which hath been long in peace, it behoveth that we have some lawful title and that the other barons and lords of France be joined and agreed thereto, or else peradventure we might be blamed and bear all the fault, if it fortuned not well. For the king is young and every man knoweth that he will soon agree to that we counsel him : if the matter do well, then well shall come thereof, and if any evil come thereby, we shall then bear the charge and be more blamed than any other, and good cause why ; for every man shall say " Behold yonder the king's uncles, the duke of Berry and of Burgoyne, how evil they have counselled the king: they have brought the realm of France into war, whereas it needed not." Wherefore, dear brother, I say, let us call together the most part of the prelates and nobles of the realm of France, and then let us skew them all the matter in the presence of the king, to whom the matter personally toucheth1 because of the heritage of Flanders, and so thereby we shall hear generally every man's will and opinion.' Ye say right well,' quoth the duke of Burgoyne, 'and as ye have devised, so shall it be done.' And with those same words the king
1 `You personally laying it before them, since the matter toucheth you.'


entered into the same chamber with an hawk on his hand, and so he spake merrily to his uncles and said : ` Ah, my fair uncles, what matter is that ye speak of in so great counsel? I would gladly know it, 1f I might.' ` Sir,' quoth the duke of Berry, ' ye may know it right well, for it pertaineth greatly to you. Sir, behold here your uncle the duke of Burgoyne, who complaineth greatly of them of Flanders ; for the false villains of Flanders hath put out of his heritage the earl their natural lord and all noblemen, and as now they lie at siege before 0udenarde with more than a hundred thousand Flemings, wherein they have besieged a great number of gentlemen. And these Flemings have a captain called Philip d'Arteveld, pure English in his courage,' and he hath sworn never to depart thence till he have his will of the town and of them that be within it, without so be that your power of France raise him from the siege, the which he hath reserved in his oath. Therefore, sir, how say you ? Will ye aid your cousin of Flanders and conquer again his heritage, the which these proud villains hath taken from him ?' ` By my faith,' quoth the king, `fair uncles, I have great will thereto, and for God's sake let us do it. I desire none other thing but to be armed, for as yet I never bare armour: it behoveth me, if I think to reign in puissance and honour, to learn the feats of arms.' These two dukes each of them regarded other and had great pleasure of the king's words. Then the duke of Berry spake again and said : `Sir, ye have said passingly well, and thus to do, sir, ye are bound for divers reasons,. Sir, the county of Flanders is of the demain of France, and ye have sworn, and we for you, to keep and maintain in their right all your liege men and also, sir, the earl of Flanders is your cousin, wherefore ye ought to love him. And therefore, sir, sith ye be in this good mind, keep you so still, and answer thereafter to every person that speaketh to you thereof: and, sir, we shall assemble hastily the prelates and barons of your realm and shall shew them all the matter in your presence; and, sir, then if ye will speak as
1 ' Pure English at heart' ; that is, desiring an alliance with England: so also in the neat chapter `This Philip d'Arteveld had ever his courage more English than French.'.




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