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formed ; but it behoved them as at that time to close their eyen and to hold down their heads, for it was no time for them then to speak. Thus they of Gaunt, being in Bruges, devised many new things, and among other they devised to beat down two gates that were toward Gaunt and to fill the dikes, to the intent that they of Bruges should never rebel after against Gaunt ; and when they should depart, to take with them 'a five hundred men of them of Bruges, to the intent to keep them in the more fear and subjection. Thus in the mean season, while these captains were at Bruges beating down gates and walls and filling of dikes, they sent to Ypres, to Courtray, to Bergues, to Cassel, to Poperinghe, to Bourbourg and to all the towns and castles of Flanders on the sea coast, that they should be all under the obeisance of them, and to send them the keys of their towns and castles, submitting themselves to their obeisance and service afid so they all obeyed, none durst say against it, but came all to Bruges putting themselves under the obeisance of Philip d'Arteveld and Peter du Bois ; for these two named and wrote themselves sovereign captains of all other, and specially Philip d'Arteveld was he that most busied himself with the charge of all Flanders: and as long as he abode in Bruges, he kept the estate of a prince, for every day he had playing at his lodging door minstrels dinner and supper, and was served in vessel of silver, as though he had been the earl of Flanders; and well he might keep then that estate, for he had all the earl's vessel, gold and silver, and all his jewels found in his house at Bruges, there was nothing saved. Also there was sent a certain number of Gauntois to Male, a fair house of the earl's standing half a mile 1 from Bruges. They that went thither did much hurt, for they brake down all the house and brake down the font wherein the earl was christened, and laid in chariots all the gold and silver jewels and other things that they found there, and sent it to Gaunt. The term of fifteen days there was going and coming with carriages from Bruges to Gaunt with their pillage that they had got that journey : it was hard to esteem the profit that they gat there.
1 `Half a league.'

And when they of Gaunt bad clone all their will and pleasure in the town of Bruges, they sent a five hundred of the notablest burgesses of the town to Gaunt, to lie there in hostage; and Francis Ackerman and Peter de Wintere and a thousand of their men conveyed them thither, and Peter du Bois abode as captain of Bruges, till the gates and walls were beaten down and the dikes filled. And Philip d'Arteveld departed with four thousand men and went to Ypres, and there all manner of people came out against him and received him as honourably as though he had been their own natural lord that had come first to his land: and there they all did put themselves under his obeisance, and there he made new mayors and aldermen and made new laws; and to him came thither they of Cassel, of Bergues, of Bourbourg and of Poperinghe, they all submitted themselves under his obeisance and sware to him faith and troth, and to hold of him as to their lord the earl of Flanders. And when he had thus done and taken the assurance of them and had tarried at Ypres the space of eight days, then he departed and came to Courtray, whereas he was also received with great joy, and there he tarried three days ; and then be sent messengers and letters to Oudenarde, commanding them to come to him and to be under his obeisance, seeing how all the country was turned to them of Gaunt, and how they were behind and did not as other did; wherefore he sent them word surely that the Gauntois should lay siege to them and not to depart till they had the town and slain all them within. When these tidings and message came to Oudenarde sent from Philip d'Arteveld, then the three'knights answered hotly and said how they set but little by the menacing of a son of a brewer of honey, nor that the heritage of the earl their lord should be so soon given to him n



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