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following them of Bruges crying, `Gaunt, Gaunt!' still going forward and beating down of people. The most part of the men of arms would not put themselves in that peril : howbeit, the earl was counselled to draw to Bruges and to be one of the first that should enter, and then to close the gates, to the intent that the Gauntois should not be lords of Bruges. The earl seeing none other remedy, nor no recoverance by abiding in the field, for he saw well every man fled and also it was dark night, wherefore he believed the counsel that was given him and so took the way toward Bruges with his banner before him, and so came to the gate and entered with the first, and a forty with him : then he set men to keep the gate, and to close it if the Gauntois did follow. Then the earl rode to his own lodging and sent all about the town commanding every man on pain of death to draw to the market-place. The intention of the earl was to recover the town by that means ; but he did not, as ye shall hear after. In the meantime that the earl was at his lodging and sent forth the clerks of every ward from street to street, to have every man to draw to the market-place to recover the town, the Gauntois pursued so fiercely their enemies, that they entered into the town with them of Bruges ; and as soon as they were within the town, the first thing they did they went straight to the marketplace and there set themselves in array. The earl as then had sent a knight of his called sir Robert Marescal to the gate, to see what the Gauntois did, and when he came to the gate, he found the gate beaten down and the Gauntois masters thereof; and some of them of Bruges met with him and said: `Sir Robert, return and save yourself if ye can, for the town is won by them of Gaunt.' Then the knight returned to the earl as fast as he might, who was coming out of his lodging a-horseback with a great number of cressets and lights with him, and was going to the market-place. Then the knight shewed the earl all that he knew : howbeit, the earl, willing to recover the town, drew to the market-place ; and as he was entering, such as were before him, seeing the place all ranged with the Gauntois, said to the earl: `Sir, return again : if ye go any farther, ye are but dead or taken with your enemies, for they are ranged on the market-place and do abide for you.' They shewed him truth; and when the Gauntois saw the clearness of the lights coming down the street, they said : ` Yonder cometh the earl : he shall come into our hands.' And Philip d'Arteveld had commanded from street to street as he went,' that if the earl came among them, that no man should do to him any bodily harm, but take him alive and then to have him to Gaunt, and so to make their peace as they list. The earl, who trusted to have recovered all, came right near to the place whereas the Gauntois were. Then divers of his men said : ` Sir, go no farther, for the Gauntois are lords of the marketplace and of the town : if ye enter into the market-place, ye are in danger to be slain or taken : a great number of the Gauntois are going from street to street seeking for their enemies : they have certain of them of the town with them to bring them from house to house, whereas they would be.' And, sir, out at any of the gates ye cannot issue, for the Gauntois are lords thereof; nor to your own lodging ye cannot return, for a great number of the Gauntois are going thither.' And when the earl heard those tidings, which were right hard to him, as it was reason, he was greatly then abashed and imagined what peril he was in. Then he believed the counsel and would go no farther, but to save himself if he might, and so took his own counsel. He commanded to put out all the lights, and said to them that were about him : ` I see well there is no recovery: let every man depart and save himself as well as he may' : and as he commanded it was done; the lights were quenched and cast into the streets, and so every man departed. The earl then went into a back lane and made a varlet of his to unarm him, and (lid cast away his armour a



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