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but passed by holding down his head. The more he held his peace, the more the people followed him, pressing to hear some tidings, and once or twice as he rode to his lodgingward, he said to them that followed him ` Sirs, return to your houses : for this day God aid you, and to-morrow at nine of the clock come into the market-place, and then ye shall hear the tidings that I can shew you.' Other answer could they have none of him, whereof every man was greatly abashed. And when Philip d'Arteveld was alighted at his lodging, and such as had been at Tournay with him, and every man gone to their own lodgings, then Peter du Bois, who desired to hear some tidings, came in the evening to Philip's house, and so then they two went together into a chamber. Then Peter demanded of him how he had sped, and Philip, who would hide nothing from him, said : 'By my faith, Peter, by that the earl of Flanders hath answered by his council sent to Tournay, he will take no manner of person within the town of Gaunt to mercy, no more one than another.' By my faith,' quoth Peter, `to say the truth, he doth but right to do so ; he is well counselled to be of that opinion, for they be all part-takers, as well one as another. Now the matter is come even after mine intent, and also it was the intent of my good master John Lyon that is dead ; for now the town will be so troubled, that it will be hard ever to appease it again. Now it is time to take bridle in the teeth now it shall be seen who is sage and who is hardy in the town of Gaunt : other shortly the town of Gaunt shall be the most honoured town in Christendom, or else the most desolate : at the least if we die in this quarrel, we shall not die all alone. Therefore, Philip, remember yourself well this night, how ye may make relation to-morrow to the people of the determination of your council holden now at Tournay, and that ye may shew it in such manner, that the people may be content with you : for ye have already the grace of the people for two causes: one is because of your name, for sometime Jaques d'Arteveld your father was marvellously well beloved ; the other cause is, ye entreat the people meekly and sagely, as the common saying is throughout the town, wherefore the people will believe you, to live or die: and at the end shew them your counsel and say how ye will do thus and thus, and they will all say the same. Therefore it behoveth you to take good advice in shewing words, whereon lieth your honour.' `Truly,' quoth Philip, ` ye say truth : and I trust so to speak and shew the besynes of Gaunt, that we who are now governours and captains shall other live or die with honour.' So thus they departed for that night each from other: Peter du Bois went home to his house, and Philip d'Arteveld abode still in his. Ye may well know and believe that when the day desired was come, that Philip d'Arteveld should generally report the effect of the council holden at Tournay, all the people of the town of Gaunt drew them to the market-place, on a Wednesday in the morning ; and about nine of the bell Philip d'Arteveld, Peter du Bois, Peter de Wintere, Francis Ackerman and the other captains came thither and entered up into the common hall. Then Philip leaned out at a window and began to speak, and said : ` O all ye good people, it is 0f truth that at the desire of the right honourable lady my lady of Brabant and the right noble duke Aubert, bailiff' of Hainault, Holland and Zealand, and of my lord the bishop of Liege, there was a council agreed and accorded to be at Tournay, and thereat to be personally the earl of Flanders, and so he certified to these said lords, who have nobly acquitted themselves, for they sent thither right notable councillors and knights and burgesses of good towns. And so they and we of this good town of Gaunt were there at the day assigned looking and abiding for the earl of Flanders, who came not nor would not come : and when they saw that he came not nor was not coming, then they sent to him to Bruges three knights for the three countries and burgesses for the good towns, and



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