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by their bushment overthrown the Gauntois and slain a three thousand of them or thereabout, what of them of Gaunt and of Ypres, then the earl determined to draw toward the town of Ypres and to lay siege thereto. And as he was counselled, so it was done, and he drew thither with all his people, a great number of knights and squires of Flanders, of Hainault and of Artois, who were come thither to serve the earl. And when they of Ypres understood that the earl came on them so strongly, they were all sore afraid, and the rich men of the town took counsel and said among themselves how they would open their gates and go and meet the earl and put themselves under his obeisance and cry him mercy, and to shew him how they were Gauntois by force, by reason of the commonty, as fullers, weavers and such other unhappy people in the town, and they thought that the earl was so pitiful, that he would have mercy on them. And as they ordained, so they did ; and so more than three hundred in a company came out of the town of Ypres and had the keys of the gates with them, and so they fell down on their knees before the earl crying for mercy, and did put themselves and their town at his pleasure. The earl had pity on them and took them to mercy, and so entered with all his puissance into the town of Ypres, and there tarried a three weeks and sent home again them of [the] Franc and of Bruges. And while the earl lay in Ypres, he caused to be beheaded more than seven hundred of fullers and weavers and of such manner of people as had brought first into that town John Lyon and the Gauntois, and slain such valiant men as the earl had set there ; for the which cause the earl was sore displeased, and to the intent that they should no more rebel, he sent a three hundred of the most notablest of them into prison in Bruges, and so then took his way to Courtray, to bring that town to his obeisance. When they of Courtray understood that the earl their lord came to them so strongly, and how that Ypres was under his obeisance, then they greatly doubted, for they saw no comfort apparent from them of Gaunt ; wherefore they were advised lightly to yield them to their lord, thinking it was better for them to hold with the earl, to whom they ought to owe their faith and homage, rather than to the Gauntois. Then they ordained a three hundred of the best of the town afoot to go into the fields to the earl, and the keys of the town with them ; and when the earl came by, they all kneeled down and cried for mercy. The earl had pity of them and received them to mercy and entered into the town joyously, and they all made to him reverence and honour. Then he took a two hundred of the best of the town of Courtray and sent them to Lille and to Douay in hostage, to the intent that that town should no more rebel. And when the earl had been there a six days, then he went to Bruges, and there refreshed him a fifteen days ; then he made a great summons to the intent to lay siege to Gaunt, for all the residue of Flanders was as then at his commandment. Then the earl departed from Bruges and so came and laid siege before Gaunt, and lodged at a place called the Biete.1 Thither came to the earl sir Robert of Namur to serve the earl with a certain number of men of war according as the earl had written unto him ; but sir William of Namur was not there; he was in France with the king and with the duke of Burgoyne. This siege began about the feast of the decollation of Saint John Baptist,2 and sir Walter d'Enghien was marshal ofall the host of Flanders : he was young and hardy and feared no pain nor peril, whatsoever fell. For all that the earl lay thus before the town of Gaunt, yet he could not so constrain them of the town, but that they kept still open three or four of their gates, so that victuals might come in to them without any danger, for they of Brussels and of Brabant were right favourable to them ; and also they of Liege, to comfort them in their opinion, sent to them a message saying thus : ` Ye good people of Gaunt, we of Liege know well how ye be sore travailed and hav



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