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stood that the earl was peaceably in Bruges, they feared, and so put themselves into the earl's mercy, and he received them and had great joy, for daily his power increased ; and also they of [the] Franc always have taken more the earl's part than all the residue of Flanders. The earl, seeing that he had brought under his subjection them of Bruges and of [the] Franc, and that he had under him knights and squires of the country of Hainault and of Artois, he thought then little and little to conquer again his country and to punish his rebels and first he ordained and said he would go and see them of Ypres, for he hated them greatly, because they opened their gates so lightly to them of Gaunt, and said how that they that had made that treaty and to let in his enemies to slay his knights should repent it, if he might get the overhand of them. Then he made his summons through [the] Franc of Bruges, saying how he would go to Ypres. Tidings came to Ypres that the earl their lord ordained himself to come and assail them : then they took counsel and determined to send word thereof to them of Gaunt, to the intent that they should send them some men to assist the town of Ypres ; for they were not big enough of themselves to keep it without aid of the Gauntois, who had promised and sworn to aid them, whensoever they had any need. So they sent covertly letters to Gaunt and to the captains, and signified to them the state of the earl and how he threatened to come and assail them. Then they of Gaunt remembered well how they were bound by their faith and promise to aid and comfort them : then they set forth two captains, John Boele and Arnold Clerck, and they said to them : 'Sirs, ye shall take with you three thousand of our men and go hastily to Ypres to comfort them as our good friends.' Incontinent they departed from Gaunt, and so these three thousand men came to Ypres, whereof they of the town had great joy. Then the earl of Flanders issued out of Bruges with a great number of men, and so came to Thourout and the next day to Poperinghe, and there tarried three days till all his men were come, and then he was about a twenty thousand men of war. They of Gaunt, who knew right well all this matter and how that the earl would go puissantly to Ypres, they determined to assemble their puissance and to go by Court ray to Ypres, and so all together to fight with the earl, saying that if they might one time overcome him, he should never be relieved after. Then all the captains departed from Gaunt, Ralph de Herselle, Peter du Bois and Peter de Wintere, John de Launoit, and divers other as centeniers and cinquanteniers, and when they were in the field, they were a nine thousand. And so long they rejourned r that they came to Courtray, whereas they were received with great joy, for John de Launoit was captain there. The earl of Flanders, being at Poperinghe and thereabout, understood that they of Gaunt were coming to Ypres and that they were at Courtray on their way. Then the earl took advice and held all his company together. They of Gaunt departed from Courtray and went to Roulers, and there rested and sent word to them of Ypres how they were come thither, shewing them how that if they would issue out of their town with their power and such as were sent to them before, how they should be all together men enow to fight with the earl ; of the which tidings they of Ypres were right joyful, and so the next day they issued out more than eight thousand, and John Boele and Arnold Clerck were their governours. The earl of Flanders and his power, who was in those marches, knew how they of Ypres were issued out of their town to meet with them of Gaunt (I cannot tell how nor by what means), insomuch that the earl ordained at a passage, by the which they of Ypres must pass, two great bushments, with his son the Hase, bastard of Flanders, and the lord d'Enghien with divers other knights and squires of Flanders and of Hainault, with them of Bruges and them of [the] Franc, and in every company there were ten thousand men. Then when they of Ypres and the Gau



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