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horseback; and they meekly inclined themselves low and did him reverence, and he passed forth without any word speaking to any of them and but a little inclined his head, and so came to his lodging called the Postern, and there dined and had many presents given him by them of the town. And there came to see him they of the law of the town' and humbly inclined themselves to him, as reason required ; and the earl said : ` Sirs, good peace requireth nothing but peace ; wherefore I would that these white hats were laid down and amends to be made for the death of my baily, for I am sore required therein of all his lineage.' 'Sir,' quoth the men of law, `it is right well our intent that it should so be; and, sir, we require your grace with all humility that it may please you to-morrow next to come into an open place, and there to shew your intent to the people: and when they see you, they will be so rejoiced that they will do everything that ye shall desire them.' Then the earl accorded to their request. The same evening many folks knew in the town how the earl should be the next morning by eight of the clock in the market-place and there preach to the people. The good men were right joyful thereof, but the fools and outrageous people gave no fear thereof, and said how they were preached enough, and how they knew well what they had to do. John Pruniaux, Ralph de Herselle, Peter du Bois and John Boele, captains of the white hats, doubted lest all that matter should be laid on their charge : and then they spake together and sent for such of their company as were most outrageous and worst of all other, and said to them: `Sirs, take heed this night and to-morrow and let your armour be ready, and whatsoever be said to you, put not off your white hats, and be all in the market-place to-morrow by eight of the bell; but make no stirring nor strife, without it be begun on you, and shew all this to your companies or else send them word thereof.' They said it should be done and so it was. In the morning at eight of the clock they came into the market-place, not all together but in divers plumps. The earl came to the market-place a-horseback, accompanied with his knights and squires and ' Les jurez de la ville,' i.e. the magistrates, them of the law of the town, and by him was John Faucille and a forty of the most richest of the town. The earl, as he came along the market-place, he cast his eyes on the white hats and was in his mind right sore displeased with them, and so alighted; and all other. Then he mounted up into a window and leaned out thereat, and a red cloth before him, and there he began to speak right sagely, shewing them from point to point the love and affection that he bath had to them, or they displeased him. There he shewed how a prince and lord ought to be beloved, feared, served and honoured of his men, and how they had done the contrary. Also he shewed how he bath kept and defended them against all men, and how he had kept them in peace, profit and prosperity in the passages of the sea, the which was closed from them at his first entering into his land. He shewed them divers reasonable points, which the wise men understood and conceived it clearly, how all that ever he said was truth. Divers gave good ear to him, and some never a whit, such as had rather have war than peace. And when he had been there the space of one hour and had shewed them all this and more, then finally he said how he would be their good lord in like manner as he had been in time past, and pardoned them of all the injuries, hates and evil wills that he had against them and all that they had done, he would hear no more thereof, and to keep them in their rights and seignories as in time past had been used ; howbeit, he desired them that they should begin no new thing nor custom, and that the white hats should be laid down. At all these words that he spake before, every man held their peace ; but when he spake of the white hats, there was such a murmuring and whispering, that it might well be perceived that it was for that cause. Then the earl desire



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