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barriers, who were not strong enough to make defence, saw the Gauntois approach ready to give assault, they went into the streets of the town and into the marketplace and cried ever as they went: `Behold here the Gauntois ready at the gate : go to your defence, for they are ready to the assault.' Then they of the town, who were assembled together to have gone to council, were right sore abashed and had no leisure to speak together to ordain for their business, and the most part of the commonalty would that the gates should have been opened, and it behoved so to be, or else it had been evil with the rich men. Then the borough-masters and rulers of the town with other went to the gate, whereas the Gauntois were ready apparelled to make assault. The borough-masters and rulers of Bruges, who had the governing of the town for that day, opened the wicket to speak with John Lyon, and so opened the barriers and the gate to treat ; and so long they spake together, that they were good friends and so entered in all together. And John Lyon rode by the borough-master, the which became him well: he was hardy and courageous, and all his men clean armed followed him. It was a fair sight to see them enter in good order, and so came to the market-place, and there he arranged his men in the streets. And John Lyon held in his hand a white warderer. So between them of Gaunt and of Bruges there was made an alliance and sworn always to be good friends together, and that they of Gaunt might summon them and lead them whithersoever they would. And anon, after that the Gauntois were arranged about the market-place, John Lyon and certain captains with him went up into the hall and there made a cry for the good town of Gaunt, commanding that every man should draw to his lodging fair and easily and unarm them without noise or moving, on pain of their heads, and that no man dislodge other nor make no noise in their lodging, whereby any strife should rise, on the same pain ; and also that no man take anything from another, without he pay therefor incontinent, on the said pain. This cry once made, then there was another cry made for the town of Bruges, that every man should meekly and agreeably receive the Gauntois into their houses and to minister to them victuals according to the common price of the town, and that the price should not be raised in no manner of thing, nor no noise to be made or debate moved ; and all these things to be kept on pain of their heads. Then every man went to their houses ; and so thus right amiably they of Gaunt were with them of Bruges two days, and there they allied and bound themselves each to other surely. These obligationswere written and sealed, and on the third day they of Gaunt departed and went to the town of Damme, where the gates were set open against their coming, and there they were courteously received and tarried there two days. Then suddenly a sickness took John Lyon, wherewith he swelled ; and the same night that the sickness took him he supped with great revel with the damosels of the town, wherefore some said he was there poisoned, whereof I know nothing, nor I will not speak too far therein. But I know well, the next day that he fell sick, at night he was laid in a litter and carried to Ardenburg : he could go no farther, but there died, whereof they of Gaunt were right sorry and sore dismayed. Of the death of John Lyon all his enemies were right glad and his friends sorry, and so he was brought to Gaunt, and because of his death all the host returned. When the tidings of his death came to Gaunt, all the people were right sorry, for he was well beloved, except of such as were of the earl's part. All the clergy came against him, and so brought him into the town with great solemnity, as though it had been the earl of Flanders: and so he was buried right honourably in the church of Saint Nicholas, and there his obsequy was done. Yet for all the death of this John Lyon, the alliances and promises made between them of Gaunt and of Bruges brake not ; for there were good hostages in the town, wherefore it held



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