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but I will say still and maintain, that if John Lyon will truly acquit himself, this ordinance may be done. And I know so much that my lord the earl, if the matter come not to his intent, John Lyon shall lose his favour and office, and give the office to me. And when I once have it, then ye shall agree thereto: we are puissant enough in this town to rule all the residue; there is none will say against us: and then I shall do so that John Lyon shall be overthrown. Thus we shall be revenged on him without any stroke giving.' All his brethren accorded to him ; so the parliament came and all the mariners were ready. There John Lyon and Gilbert Mahew shewed them the earl's pleasure on the new statute that he would raise on the navy of Lys and l'Escault, the which thing seemed to them all right hard and contrary to their old custom; and the chief that spake thereagainst were Gilbert Mahew's brethren more than any other. Then John Lyon, who was chief ruler of them all, was right joyous, for he would to his true power maintain them in their old ancient franchises and liberties, and he weened that all that they said had been for him : but it was contrary, for it was for an evil intent towards him. John Lyon reported to the earl the answer of the mariners, and said `Sir, it is a thing cannot be well done, for great hurt may come thereby. Sir, an it please you, let the matter rest in the old ancient estate and make no new thing among them.' This answer pleased nothing the earl, for he saw that if the matter might be brought up and raised, it should be well worth to him yearly a seven thousand florins. So he held his peace as at that time, but he thought the more ; and so pursued by fair words and treaties these mariners, but always John Lyon found them right obstinate in the case. Then Gilbert Mahew came to the earl and to his council, and said how that John Lyon acquitted him but slackly in the matter; but an the earl would give him the office that John Lyon hath, he would so handle the mariners, that the earl of Flanders should heritably have the said profit. The earl saw not clear, for covetousness of the good' blinded him, and by his own counsel he put John Lyon 1 `Covetousness of gain.' out of the office and gave it to Gilbert Mahew. When Gilbert Mahew saw how he had the office, within a little space he turned all his six brethren to his purpose and so made the earl to have his intent and profit ; wherefore he was never the better beloved of the most part of the mariners. Howbeit, it behoved them to suffer, for the seven brethren were great and puissant with the aid of the earl. Thus by this subtle means Gilbert Mahew gat himself in favour with the earl, and he gave many gifts and jewels to them that were near about the earl, whereby he had their loves, and also he gave many great presents to the earl, the which blinded him, and so by that means he gat his love : and all these gifts and presents this Gilbert Mahew raised of the mariners, whereof there were many that were not well content ; howbeit, they durst speak no word to the contrary. John Lyon by this means and by the purchase of Gilbert Mahew was out of the earl's favour and love, and so kept his house and lived of his own, and endured and suffered patiently all that ever was done to him. For this Gilbert Mahew, who as then was chief ruler of all the ships, covertly ever hated this John Lyon, and took away the third or fourth part of the profit that he should have had of his ships. All this John Lyon suffered and spake no word, but sagely dissimuled and took in gree all that ever was done to him, and said `There is time to be still and time to speak.' This Gilbert Mahew had one brother called Stenuart, a subtle man, who advised well the manner of John Lyon, and said to his brethren in prophesying as :t came to pass : ` Sirs, this John Lyon suffereth now and hangeth down his head: he doth it all for policy ; but I fear me he will at length make us lower than we be now high : but I counsel one thing, that while we be thus in the earl's favour, let us slay him. I shall so



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