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between Windsor and Westminter : he was believed on his faith. The same season the princess, mother to king Richard, lay at Windsor, and her daughter with her, my lady Maude, the fairest lady in all England. The earl of Saint-Pol and this young lady were in true amours together each of other, and sometime they met together at dancing and carolling, till at last it was spied ; and then the lady discovered to her mother how she loved faithfully the young earl of Saint - Pol. Then there was a marriage spoken of between the earl of Saint-Pol and the lady Maude of Holland, and so the earl was set to his ransom to pay sixscore thousand franks, so that when he had married the lady Maude then to be rebated threescore thousand, and the other threescore thousand to pay. And when this covenant of marriage was made between the earl and the lady, the king of England suffered the earl to repass the sea to fetch his ransom, on his only promise to return again within a year after. So the earl came into France to see his friends, the king, the earl of Flanders, the duke of Brabant and his cousins in France. In the same year there was made an hard information against the earl of Saint-Pol ; for it was laid to his charge that he should deliver to the Englishmen the strong castle of Bohain, and so the French king caused him to be rested and kept in surety. And so the king shewed how the earl of SaintPol would have made an evil treaty for him and for the realm, and the earl in no wise could be excused. And also for the same cause there was kept in prison in the castle of Mons in Hainault the lord canon of Robersart,1 the lord of Vertaing, sir James du Sart and Gerard d'Obies ; but at length all that matter came to none effect, for there could nothing be proved against them, and so they were delivered. Then the young earl returned again into England to acquit him of his promise, and so wedded the lady and did so much that he paid his threescore thousand franks, and so passed again the sea. But he entered not 1 Thierry, called le Chanoine de Robersart. It is doubtful what is the origin of this by-name, but ht was certainly not an ecclesiastic. One of his sons (Louis) was made a knight of the Garter by Henry V., and married Elizabeth Bourchier, be gmg to the same family as the resent translator r the Chronicles (Lettenhove, xxiii. 28). into France because the king loved him not ; and so he and the countess his wife went and lay at the castle of Ham on the river of Heure, the which castle the lord of Moriaume, who had wedded his sister, lent him to lie in. And there he lay as long as king Charles of France lived, for the earl could never get his love. Now let us leave to speak of this matter and return to the business of France. The same season all Bretayne was kept close, what against the French king and against the duke. Howbeit, some of the good towns of Bretayne held themselves close in the duke's name, and many had great marvel that they took him for their lord. And also divers knights and squires of Bretayne were of the same accord, and also there was allied to then: the countess of Penthievre, mother to the children of Bretayne. But sir Bertram of Guesclin, constable of France, the lord Clisson, the lord de Laval, the viscount of Rohan and the lord of Rochefort, they held the country in war with the puissance that came daily to them out of France ; for at Pontorson, at Saint- Malo-the-Isle1 and thereabout lay a great number of men of arms of France, of Normandy, of Auvergne and of Burgoyne, who did much hurt in the country. The duke of Bretayne, who was in England, had knowledge of everything and how the duke of Anjou was at Angers and daily destroyed his country. Also he had knowledge, how the good towns kept themselves close in his name, and certain knights and squires of the same part, whereof he could them good thank. Yet that notwithstanding, he durst not well trust in them to jeopard to return into Bretayne on the trust of his men, for always he doubted of treason. Also the king of England nor the duke of Lancaster would not counse



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