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better for him to keep his tongue than to speak, and so gave no answer to those words: and when he saw his time, he took his leave of the earl and of the lords and departed out of their presence, and some noblemen that were about the earl made him way and made him to drink, and then he returned again to Sluys to his lodging. And I shall shew you what fell after. Though all his purveyance were ready apparelled and that he had wind at will to have sailed into Scotland, yet he durst not put himself into the dangers of the sea : for it was shewed him how he was spied by the Englishmen that he lay at Sluys, and how that if he kept on his voyage he was likely to be taken and carried into England ; and because of those doubts he brake his viage and returned to Paris to the king. Ye may well know that the lord of Bournazel told no less to the French Icing than was done to him by the earl of Flanders, and also it was needful for him to tell all for his excuse, for the king had marvel of his returning. The same season there were divers knights in the king's chamber, and specially sir John of Ghistelles of Hainault, cousin to the earl of Flanders, who had great displeasure at the words of this knight that he had of the earl of Flanders, so that finally he could keep his tongue no longer, but said : `I cannot suffer these words thus to be spoken of my dear lord ; and, sir knight, if ye will say that he did as ye say, to let you of your viage, in that quarrel I appeal you to the field and here is my gage.' The lord of Bournazel was nothing abashed to answer, but said : ` Sir John, I say thus, how I was thus taken by the baily of Sluys and brought before the earl of Flanders, and as ye have heard, he said to me, and in like wise so did the duke of Bretayne ; and if ye will say contrary to this, I will receive your gage.' ` I will say so,' quoth the lord of Ghistelles. With those words the king was not content, and said, ` Let us go hence: I will hear no more of these words' and so departed and went into his chamber, all only with his chamberlains, right glad that the lord of Bournazel had so well and freely spoken against the words of sir John of Ghistelles, and said all smiling: 'He hath holden foot well with him : I would not for twenty thousand franks but that he had done so.' And after it fortuned so that this sir John of Ghistelles, who was chamberlain with the king, was so evil beloved in the court, that he was weary thereof and thought not to abide the dangers. So he took leave of the king and departed from the court and went into Brabant, to the duke Wenceslas of Brabant, who received him joyfully. The French king was sore displeased with the earl of Flanders, because it was thought by divers of the realm that he had letted the lord of Bournazel of his viage into Scotland, and also in that he held still about him the duke of Bretayne his cousin, who was greatly in the king's displeasure. And so they that were about the king perceived well how the earl of Flanders was nothing in the king's grace. Anon after, the king wrote sharp letters to his cousin the earl of Flanders, threatening him, because he sustained with him the duke of Bretayne, whom he reputed to be his enemy. The earl wrote again to the king excusing himself as well as he might. but it availed nothing ; for the Icing sent him again more sharper letters, shewing him plainly that, without he would put the duke of Bretayne out of his company, he would surely displease him. When the earl of Flanders saw that the king pursued his cause with such effect, then he took advice in himself and thought he would shew these menaces and threatenings to his good towns, and specially to Gaunt, to know what they would say to the matter. And so he sent to Bruges, to Ypres and Courtray, and after departed, and the duke of Bretayne in his company, and so went to Gaunt and lodged at the Postern,' where be was joyfully received of the burgesses, for they loved well to have him among them. And when the people of the good towns, such as were sent for, were come, the earl assembled them to



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