Page 209

Page 209 (Chronicles of Froissart)



page 209


posed 1 that the heritage of the children of the king of Navarre, the which was fallen to them by the right of their mother, that the French king their uncle by the succession of his sister ought to have power thereof in name of the children, seeing the children were in his keeping; whereby all the land that the king of Navarre held in Normandy should be in the French king's hand, as long as his nephews were within age. Of all these matters the king of Navarre doubted greatly, for he knew well the usage and custom of France. Then he advised him of two things : the one was to send the bishop of Pampelone and sir Martin Carra into France to the king, desiring him heartily that for good love and favour to send him his two sons Charles and Peter, and if it pleased him not to send him both two, then at least to send him his son Charles, because he was towards a treaty for a marriage for him with the daughter of the king of Castile. The second thing was, notwithstanding that he sent thus into France, yet secretly he sent also into Normandy, to visit and to refresh the castles there pertaining to him, to the intent that the Frenchmen should not take them into their hands: for he feared, if they had them once in their possessions, he should not have them again when he would. And so he sent two valiant men of arms Navarrois, in whom he had great trust, the one called Peter Basele and the other Ferrando, into Normandy for the said intent. The first messengers went into France, as the bishop of Pampelone and sir Martin Carra, who spake with the king at great leisure, right humbly recommending the king of Navarre to him, desiring in his name that he would send to him his two sons. The king answered and said, he would take advice and counsel in the matter: and so after they were answered in the king's name, the king being present and the two children also his nephews, how that the

1 The true text runs thus: ' Ye have heard right well before how the king of Navarre was left a widower, who had had to wife the sister of the king of France, and how the wise men of the realm of France, taking advice one with another, said and proposed,' etc. The translator gives us a pretty literal rendering of his text, which was hope less. The words `was left a widower' and `realm of France' were there omitted, and `par I'avis l'un de l'autre' was corrupted into `par I'amour fun de I'autre.' king loved them right entirely, wherefore they could not be better in no place, and that the king of Navarre ought to be content rather to suffer them to be in France with the king their uncle than in any other place; and also the king will in no wise depart from them, but keep them about him in their estate as the children of a king and like his nephews. Other answer the messengers could not have. And in the mean season that these messengers were in France, Peter of Basele and Ferrando arrived at Cherbourg with great provision, the which they put in divers places, in towns and castles of the king of Navarre's in Normandy, and so they visited in the king of Navarre's name all the county of Evreux, and made new officers and set in people at their pleasures. And so returned again into Navarre the bishop of Pampelone and sir Martin Carra and shewed the king how they had sped in France. The king of Navarre was not very glad of that tidings, when he could not have his own sons, and so began a great hatred in his heart toward the French king, the which he would gladly have shewed, if he had might, but the puissance of himself was not so great to grieve the realm of France without help and aid of some other realm: so he suffered all these matters, till he had better cause to speak and more displeasure done to him than he had as then. The French king and his council were well informed that the king of Navarre had new revictualled his castles and towns in Normandy, but they knew not for what intent. The same season the Englishmen made a secret army on the sea of two thousand men of arms, but they had no horse with them, of the which army the duke of Lancaster and the ea



Page 209 (Chronicles of Froissart)