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with much pain he had any leisure to take heed anything to himself or to his Church. Then he said to himself he would go farther off from them to be more at rest ; and so he caused provision to be made on the river of Genes r and all the ways as he should pass, as it appertained to such an high estate as he was; and then he said to his cardinals ` Sirs, make you ready, for I will to Rome.' Of that motion his cardinals were sore abashed and displeased, for they loved not the Romans, and so they would fain have turned his purpose, but they could not. And when the French king knew thereof, he was sore displeased, for he thought he had the pope nearer at hand there than in any other place. Then the king wrote incontinent to his brother the duke of Anjou, who was at Toulouse, signifying him that after the sight of his letters he should go to Avignon to the pope and break his voyage to Rome, if it were possible. The duke did as the king commanded him, and so came to Avignon, where the cardinals received him with great joy, and so was lodged in the pope's palace, the ofter thereby to speak with the pope. Ve may well know he spake with the pope and shewed him divers reasons to have broken his purpose: but the pope would in no wise consent thereto nor take any heed of any businesses on 'this side the moun. tains ; but the pope gave the duke full puissance to do what he might, reserving certain cases papal, the which he might not give to no man, nor put them out of his own hands. When the duke saw he could not come to his intent for no reason nor fair words that he could shew, he took leave of the pope and said at his departing: Holy father, ye go into a good country among such people whereas ye be but little beloved, and ye will leave the fountain of faith and the realm whereas holy Church hath most faith and excellence of all the world. And, sir, by your deed the Church may fall in great tribulation ; for if ye die there, the which is right likely, and so say the physicians, then the Romans, who be malicious and traitors, shall be lords and masters of all the cardinals and shall make a pope at their own will.' Howbeit, for all these words and many other, the pope never rested till he was on his way, and so 1 That is, the Riviera of Genoa. 1 Sta. Maria Maggiore, on the Esquiline. 2 That is, the bourg of Saint Peter, the Leonine city. came to Marseille, whereas the galleys of Genes were ready to receive him, and the duke returned again to Toulouse. Pope Gregory entered into the sea at Marseille with a great company, and had good wind and so took land at Genes, and there new refreshed his galleys and so took the sea again and sailed till he came to Rome. The Romans were right joyful of his coming, and all the chief of Rome mounted on their horses and so brought him into Rome with great triumph, and lodged in Saint Peter's palace. And oftentimes he visited a church called our Lady the Great' within Rome, wherein he had great pleasure and did make therein many costly works. And within a while after his coming to Rome he died, and was buried in the said church, and there his obsequy was made, as to a pope appertained. Anon after the death of the pope Gregory, the cardinals drew them into the conclave in the palace of Saint Peter. Anon after, as they were entered to choose a pope, according to their usage, such one as should be good and profitable for holy Church, the Romans assembled them together in a great number and came into the bourage of Saint Peter.2 They were to the number of thirty thousand, what one and other, in the intent to do evil, if the matter went not according to their appetites. And they came oftentimes before the conclave and said : , Hark ye, sir cardinals, deliver you at once and make a pope: ye tarry too long. If ye make a Roman, we will not change him ; but if ye make any other, the Roman people and counsels will not take him for pope, and ye put yourselves all in adventure to be slain.' The cardinals, who were as then in the danger of the Romans and heard well those words, they were not at their ease nor ass



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