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again to Calais the earl of Salisbury, the bishop of Saint David's, chancellor of England, and the bishop of Hereford : and for the French king at Montreuil there was the lord of Coucy, sir Willam of Dormans, chancellor of France. But they durst never trust to meet together in any place between Montreuil and Calais, nor between Montreuil and Boulogne, nor in the frontiers, for anything that the two bishops ambassadors could door sbew. Thus these entreators abode in this estate, till the truce was expired. And when the war was open, then sir Hugh Calverley was sent to be keeper of Calais. When pope Gregory being at Avignon understood that no peace could be had between France and England, he was right sorrowful and ordered his business shortly and went to Rome. And when the duke of Bretayne, who had been more than a year with the earl of Flanders his cousin, saw that the war was open, he took leave of the earl and went to Gravelines, and thither he came to the earl of Salisbury and sir Guichard d'Angle, and so went with them to Calais and there tarried the space of a month, and so went into England and came to Sheen, a four leagues from London along by the Thames side, where the king of England lay sore sick and passed out of this world the vigil of Saint John Baptist the year of our Lord a thousand three hundred and seventy-seven. Then was there great sorrow made in England, and incontinent all the passages of the realm were stopped, that none should issue out of the realm ; for they would not that the death of the king should be so soon known in France, till they bad set the realm in some order. The same time there came into England the earl of Salisbury and sir Guichard d'Angle. So the body of king Edward the third with great processions, weepings and lamentations, his sons behind him with all the nobles and prelates of England, was brought along the city of London with open visage to Westminster, and there he was buried beside the queen his wife. And anon after, the young king Richard was crowned at the palace of Westminster with great solemnity, and by him stood the dukes of Lancaster and of Bretayne, the eleventh year of his age, in the month of July : the which day there was made four earls and nine knights ; first the lord Thomas his uncle was made earl of Buckingham, the lord Percy earl of Northumberland, sir Guichard d'Angle earl of Huntingdon, the lord Mowbray earl of Nottingham : and the young king was put unto the rule of the gentle knight sir Guichard d'Angle by the accord of all the land, to be instructed in noble virtues, and the realm of England to be governed by the duke of Lancaster. And as soon as the French king knew of the death of king Edward, he said how right nobly and valiantly he had reigned, and well he ought to be put newly in remembrance among the number of the worthies. Then he assembled a great number of the nobles and prelates of his realm and did his obsequy in the Holy Chapel in his palace at Paris. And anon after died the eldest daughter of the French king, who was ensured to have been married to William of Hainault, eldest son of duke Aubert.

CHAPTERS CCCXV-CCCXVH

SUMMARY. - The French king sent a great navy to sea and ravaged the coasts of England. The captal de Buch, after being a prisoner in France for five years, died in the Temple at Paris. The duke of Burgundy took Ardres and other fortresses near Calais. War was renewed between the French king and the king of Navarre, and the king of Navarre lost the county of Evreux, except Cherbourg, which was fruitlessly besieged by the French. The French gained Auray and other towns in Brittany, and laid a garrison against Cherbourg under sir William des Bordes, who was defeated and made prisoner by the English on Saint Martin's day in July 1379 Here ends the first book of the Chronicles, which coincides with the first volume of the translators French text. Some of the events which have been shortly mentioned before this are related with more detail in the second book. Each book was or iginally a separate work, and that edition of th



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