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and La Rochelle turned French, and the whole of Poitou, Saintonge and Rochelle was conquered from the English.

CHAPTERS CCCVII-CCCXIII

SUMMAR Y. -War was carried on against the English in Brittany, and siege was laid to Becherel. King David of Scotland died and was succeeded by Robert Stuart his nephew. The constable du Gueselin came to Brittany, and the duke of Brittany retired to England. Nearly all Brittany was conquered by the French in spate of the efforts of the English to strengthen theirforces. The duke of Anjou conquered towns in upper Gascony. Negotiations for a peace were carried on at Bruges, and a truce was made, to last for one year.

CHAPTER CCCXIV

Of the journey that the lord of Coucy made in Austrich, and of the death of the prince of Wales, and how there could be found no manner of treaty of peace between the two kings : and also of the death of the king of England, Edward the third.

THE same season there was come into France the lord of Coney, who had been long in Lombardy with the earl of Vertus, son to sir Galeas, making war against sir Bernabo and his allies, because of pope Gregory the eleventh, and for the holy college of Rome. The lord of Coucy by succession of his mother, who was sister to the duke of Austrich last deceased, whereby he ought to be inheritor to the duchy, for the duke was dead without issue by way of marriage: and they of Austrich had given the duchy and lands to another farther off by lineage than the lord Coucy, whereof the lord Coucy had oftentimes complained to the emperor, the lord Charles of Bohemia. The emperor knew well that the lord Coucy had right thereto : howbeit, he might not with his ease constrain them of Austrich, for they were strong in his country and many good men of war. The lord of Coney had made war there before by the comfort of his aunt, sister to the duke, but little it availed him. And when he was thus come into France, the king made him great cheer. Then he advised and saw well how there was in France as then many men of war sat as idle: wherefore he thought they could not be better occupied than to help him to his right during the truce between France and England. Then the lord of Coucy desired the king to let him have of the Bretons such as overran the realm, to make war with him in Austrich. The king,. who would gladly that the companions were out of his realm, accorded to his desire : so the king lent or gave him, I cannot tell whether, a sixty thousand franks to depart among the said companions. So they rode forth toward Austrich about the feast of Saint Michael : they did much evil all the ways as they went : also there were divers barons, knights and squires of France, of Artois, of Vermandois, of Hainault and of Picardy, as the viscounts of Meaux and d'Aunay, sir Ralph of Coucy, the baron of Roye, Peter of Bar and divers other, desiring to advance their bodies to get them honour. When the feast of All Saints began to approach, then there came again to Bruges to entreat for peace from the French king, the duke of Burgoyne, the earl of Sarrebruck, the bishop of Amiens and the duke of Anjou, but he lay still at Saint-Omer's ; and from the king of England thither came the duke of Lancaster, the duke of Bretayne, the earl of Salisbury, the bishop of London. The town of Bruges was well garnished with divers estates, and specially the duke of Burgoyne kept there a noble estate; and with the duke of Lancaster there was sir Robert of Namur and kept him good company as long as the duke was in Flanders; and there were the ambassadors, the archbishop of Rouen and the bishop of Carpentras, who went still and laboured between both parties and laid forth many good reasons, but none came to any effect. These lords were far asunder in their treaties; for the French king demanded to have again fourteen hundred thousand franks, the which were paid for the redemption of king John, and to have Calais rased and beaten down, to the which the king of England would never consent: so the truce was continued to the feast of




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