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and Frenchmen were greatly comforted, when they saw the captain of their enemies on the earth, thinking verily that he had his death's wound. Then they advanced themselves and said: ` Ye Englishmen, yield you, for ye are all ours, ye cannot scape us.' There the Englishmen did marvels in arms, as well to defend themselves as to revenge their master sir John Chandos, whom they saw lie in a hard case. And a squire of sir John Chandos spied Jaques of Saint-Martin, who had given his master his mortal stroke, and ran to him fiercely and struck him with such violence, that his glaive pierced through both his thighs. Howbeit, for all that stroke, he left not still to fight. If sir Thomas Percy and his company had known of this adventure, who were on the other side of the bridge, they should well have succoured him ; but because they knew nothing thereof, nor heard no more of the Frenchmen, weening to them they had been gone back, therefore he and his company departed and took the way to Poitiers, as they that knew nothing of that business. Thus the Englishmen fought still before the bridge of Lussac, and there was done many a feat of arms. Briefly, the Englishmen could endure no longer against the Frenchmen, so that the most part of them were discomfited and taken, but always Edward Clifford would not depart from his nephew, thereas he lay. So thus, if the Frenchmen had been so happy as to have had their horses there ready, as they had not, for their pages were run away from them before, or else they might have departed with much honour and profit with many a good prisoner, and for lack of them they lost all : wherefore they were sore displeased and said among themselves: ` Ah, this is an evil order; for the journey is ours, and yet through fault of our pages we cannot depart, seeing we be heavy armed and sore travailed, so that we cannot go afoot through this country, the which is full of our enemies and contrary to us, and we are a six leagues from the next fortress that we have, and also divers of our company be sore hurt and we may not leave them behind us.' Thus as they were in this case and wist not what to do, and had sent two Bretons unarmed into the fields to see if they might find any of their pages with their horses, there came on them sir Guichard d'Angle, sir Louis Harcourt, the lord Partenay, the lord Tannay-Bouton, the lord d'Argenton, the lord of Poyanne, sir Jaques of Surgeres, and divers other Englishmen to the number of two hundred spears, who rode about to seek for the Frenchmen, for it was shewed them how they were abroad: and so they fell in the track of the horses and came in great haste with banners and pennons waving in the wind. And as soon as the Bretons and Frenchmen saw them coming, they knew well they were their enemies: then they said to the Englishmen whom they had taken as prisoners before: ` Sirs, behold yonder cometh a band of your company to succour you, and we perceive well that we cannot endure against them, and ye be our prisoners. We will quit you, so that ye will keep us, and will become your prisoners; for we had rather yield us to you than to them that cometh yonder.' And they answered : 'As ye will, so are we content.' Thus the Englishmen were loosed out of their prisons. Then the Poitevins, Gascons and Englishmen came on them, their spears in their rests, crying their cries. Then the Frenchmen and Bretons drew aside and said to them: `Sirs, leave : do us no hurt : we be all prisoners already.' 1 The Englishmen affirmed the same and said: `They be our prisoners.' Charnel was prisoner with sir Bertram of Casselis and sir Louis of Saint-Julian with sir John Clanvowe, so that there was none but that he had a master. The barons and knights of Poitou were sore discomforted, when they saw their seneschal sir John Chandos lie on the earth and could not speak. Then they lamentably complained and said, ` Ah, sir John Chandos, the flower of all chivalry, unhappily was that glaive forged that thus hath wounded you and brought you in peril of death.' They wept piteously that were about him, and h



Page 197 (Chronicles of Froissart)