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Englishmen doubted most, then the earl of Pembroke called a squire to him and said Friend, take my courser and issue out at the back postern and we shall make you way, and ride straight to Poitiers and shew sir John Chandos the state and danger that we be in, and recommend me to him by this token,' and took a ring from his finger and delivered to him and said, ` Take sir John Chandos this ring; he knoweth it right well.' The squire who took that enterprise thought it should be a great honour to him, if he might achieve to scape and speak with him; took the ring, and mounted incontinent on his courser and departed by a privy way, while the assault endured, and took the way to Poitiers. In the mean season the assault was terrible and fierce by the Frenchmen, and the Englishmen defended themselves right valiantly with good courage, as it stood them well in hand so to do. Now let us speak of the first squire, that departed from Puirenon at the hour of midnight and all the night he rode out of his way, and when it was morning and fair clay, then he knew his way and so rode toward Poitiers, and by that time his horse was weary. Howbeit, he came thither by nine of the clock and there alighted before sir John Chandos' lodging and entered and found him at mass, and so came and kneeled down before him and did his message as he was commanded. And sir John Chandos, who was not content for the other day before, in that the earl of Pembroke would not ride with him, as ye have heard before, wherefore he was not lightly inclined to make any great haste, but said: ` It will be hard for us to come thither time enough and to hear out this mass.' And anon after mass the tables were covered ready to dinner, and the servants demanded of him if he would go to dinner, and he said, ` Yes, sith it is ready.' Then he went into his hall, and knights and squires brought him water, and as he was a washing, there came into the hall the second squire from the earl of Pembroke and kneeled down and took the ring out of his purse and said ` Right dear sir, the earl of Pembroke recommendeth him to you by this token and desireth you heartily to come and comfort him and bring him out of the danger that he and his be in at Puirenon.' Then sir John Chandos took the ring and knew it well and said: `To come thither betimes it were hard, if they be in that case as ye shew me. Let us go to dinner': and so sat down, and all his company, and ate the first course. And as he was served of the second course and was eating thereof, suddenly sir John Chandos, who greatly had imagined of that matter, and at last cast up his head and said to his company : `Sirs, the earl of Pembroke is a noble man and of great lineage : he is son to my natural lord the king of England, for he hath wedded his daughter, and in everything he is companion to the earl of Cambridge. He hath required me to come to him in his business, and I ought to consent to his desire and to succour and comfort him, if we may come betimes.' Therewith he put the table from him and said: `Sirs, I will ride toward Puirenon ' whereof his people had great joy and incontinent apparelled, and the trumpets sowned and every man mounted on their horses they that best might, as soon as they heard that sir John Chandos would ride to Puirenon to comfort the earl of Pembroke and his company, who were besieged there. Then every knight, squire and man of arms went out into the field, so they were more than two hundred spears and alway they increased. Thus as they rode forth together, tidings came to the Frenchmen, who had continually assaulted the fortress from the morning till it was high noon, by their spies, who said to them: `Sirs, advise you well, for sir John Chandos is departed from Poitiers with more than two hundred spears and is coming hitherward in great haste, and hath great desire to find you here.' And when sir Louis of Sancerre and sir John of Vienne, sir John of Bueil and the other captains heard those tidings, the wisest among them said : ` Sirs, our people are sore weary and travailed with assaulting of t



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