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advantage, and so we shall discomfit him, I doubt not.' The counsel of sir Bertram of Guesclin was well heard and taken, and so king Henry in an evening departed from the host with a certain of the best knights and fighting men that he could choose out in all his host, and left the residue of his company in the keeping and governing of his brother the earl don Tello, and so rode forth. And he had seven spies ever coming and going, who ever brought him word what his brother don Peter did and all his host. And king don Peter knew nothing how his brother came so hastily toward him, wherefore he and his company rode the more at large without any good order; and so in a morning king Henry and his people met and encountered his brother king don Peter, who had lien that night in a castle thereby called Montiel, and was there well received and had good cheer, and was departed thence the same morning, weeping full little to have been fought withal as that day. And so suddenly on him with banners displayed there came his brother king Henry and his brother Sancho and sir Bertram of Guesclin, by whom the king and all his host was greatly ruled. And also with them there was the Begue of Villaines, the lord of Roquebertin, the viscount of Roda and their companies. They were a six thousand fighting men and they rode all close together and so ran and encountered their enemies crying, `Castile for king Henry! ' and `Our Lady of Guesclin !' and so they discomfited and put aback the first brunt. There were many slain and cast to the earth, there were none taken to ransom, the which was appointed so to be by sir Bertram of Guesclin because of the great number of Saracens that was there. And when king don Peter, who was in the midst of the press among his own people, heard how his men were assailed and put aback by his brother the bastard Henry and by the Frenchmen, he had great marvel thereof and saw well how he was betrayed and deceived, and in adventure to lose all, for his men were sore sparkled abroad. Howbeit, like a good hardy knight and of good comfort, rested on the field and caused his banner to be unrolled to draw together his people, and sent word to them that were behind to haste them forward, because he was fighting with his enemies; whereby every man advanced forward to the banner. So there was a marvellous great and a fierce battle, and many a man slain of king don Peter's part ; for king Henry and sir Bertram of Guesclin sought their enemies with so courageous and fierce will, that none could endure against them. Howbeit, that was not lightly done, for king don Peter and his company were six against one, but they were taken so suddenly, that they were discomfited in such wise that it was marvel to behold. This battle of the Spaniards one against another, and of these two kings and their allies,was near to Montiel, the which was that day right fierce and cruel. There were many good knights of king Henry's part, as sir Bertram of Guesclin, sir Geoffrey Richon, sir Arnold Limousin, sir Gawain of Bailleul, the Begue of Villaines, Alain of Saint-Pol, Alyot of Tallay and divers other; and also of the realm of Aragon there was the viscount of Roquebertin, the viscount of Roda, and divers other good knights and } squires, whom I cannot all name. And there they did many noble deeds of arms, ; the which was needful to them so to do, for they found fierce and strong people against them, as Saracens, Jews and Portugals. The Jews fled and turned their backs and fought no stroke, but they of Granade and of Bellemarine fought fiercely with their bows and archegays and did that clay many a noble deed of arms. And king don Peter was a hardy knight and fought valiantly with a great axe and gave therewith many a great stroke, so that none durst approach near to him ; and the banner of king Henry his brother met and rencountered against his, each of them crying their cries. Then the battle of king don Peter began to open : then don Ferrant of Castro, who was chief counsellor about king don Peter, saw and perceived well how his people began to l



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