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would help him, he said : `Sir king, truly I am but dead, if that it please you ; and, sir, gladly I yield me unto you, but to none other. Therefore, sir, if your mind be to put me into any other man's hands, shew it me ; for I had rather die than to be put into the hands of my bitter enemy the king of Aragon.' ` Sir,' said the king, `fear you not I will do you but right. If I did otherwise, I were to blame. Ye shall be my prisoner, other to acquit you or to ransom you at my pleasure.' Thus was the king of Mallorca taken by king Henry, and caused him to be well kept there ; and then he rode further to the city of Leon in Spain, the which incontinent was opened against him. When the town and city of Leon in Spain was thus rendered to king Henry, all the country and marches of Galice turned and yielded them to king Henry, and to him came many great lords and barons, who before had done homage to king don Peter; for whatsoever semblant they had made to him before the prince, yet they loved him not, because of old time he had been to them so cruel and they were ever in fear that he would turn to his cruelty again, and king Henry was ever amiable and meek to them, promising to do much for them, therefore they all drew to him. Sir Bertram of Guesclin was not as then in his company, but he was coming with a two thousand fighting men, and was departed from the duke of Anjou, who had achieved his war in Provence and broken up his siege before Tarascon by composition, I cannot shew how. And with sir Bertram of Guesclin there were divers knights and squires of France, desiring to exercise the feat of arms; and so they came towards king Henry, who as then had laid siege before Toledo. Tidings came to king don Peter how the country turned to his bastard brother, thereas he lay in the marches of Seville and Portugal, where he was but smally beloved. And when he heard thereof, he was sore displeased against his brother and against them of Castile, because they forsook him,.and sware a great oath that he would take on them so cruel a vengeance, that it should be ensample to all other. Then he sent out his commandment to such as he trusted would aid and serve him, but he sent to some such as came not to him, but turned to king Henry and sent their homages to him. And when this king don Peter saw that his men began to fail him, then he began to doubt, and took counsel of don Ferrant of Castro, who never failed him; and he gave him counsel that he should get as much people together as he might, as well out of Granade as out of other places, and so in all haste to ride against his brother the bastard, or he did conquer any further in the country. Then king don Peter sent incontinent to the king of Portugal, who was his cousin-german also he sent to the king of Granade and of Bellemarine and to the king of Tremesen and made alliances with them three, and they sent him more than twenty thousand Saracens to help him in his war. So thus king don Peter did so much that, what of christen men and of Saracens, he had to the number of forty thousand men in the marches of Seville. And in the mean season, while that king Henry lay at siege, sir Bertram of Guesclin came to him with two thousand fighting men and he was received with great joy, for all the host was greatly rejoiced of his coming. King don Peter, who had made his assembly in the marches of Seville and thereabout, desiring greatly to fight with the bastard his brother, departed from Seville and took his journey towards Toledo to raise the siege there, the which was from him a seven days' journey. Tidings came to king Henry how that his brother don Peter approached, and in his company more than forty thousand men of one and other. And thereupon he took counsel, to the which council was called the knights of France and of Aragon, and specially sir Bertram of Guesclin, by whom the king was most ruled ; and his counsel was that king Henry should advance forth to encounter his brother don Peter, and in what condition soever that he found him in, incontinent to set on and fight with him, saying



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