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Page 185 (Chronicles of Froissart)



page 185


them by the prince that they should return again thither at a day assigned. Thus the barons and lords of Gascoyne returned into their countries and agreed firmly together that they would not return again to the prince, nor suffer the fouage to run in the lands: then they made war against the prince therefor. Thus the country began to rebel against the prince, and the lord of Armagnac, the lord d'Albret, the lord of Comminges, the earl of Puycornet, and divers other prelates, barons, knights and squires of Gascoyne went into France and made great complaints in the French king's chamber, the king and his peers being present, of the griefs that the prince of Wales would do to them, saying how their resort ought to be to the French king and to draw to him as to their sovereign lord. And the king, who would not break the peace between him and the king of England, began to dissemble and said ` Sirs, surely the jurisdiction of our heritage and of the crown of France we will always keep and augment ; but we have sworn to divers articles in the peace, of the which I remember not all. Therefore we shall visit and behold the tenour of the letters, and inasmuch as we may do we shall aid you, and shall be glad to agree you with the prince our dear nephew: for peradventure he is not well counselled to put you or your subjects from their freedoms and franchises.' So with the answer that the king made them at that time they were content, and so abode still at Paris with the king, in purpose not to return again into their own countries, with the which the prince was nothing well Content, but always he still persevered in the purpose of raising of this fouage. Sir John Chandos, who was one of the greatest of his council, was contrary to this opinion and would gladly that the prince would have left it but when he saw that the prince would not leave his purpose, to the intent that he would bear no blame nor reproach in the matter, he took his leave of the prince and made his excuse to go into Normandy to visit the land of Saint-Saviour the Viscount, whereof he was lord, for he had not been there in three years before. The prince gave him leave, and so he departed out of Poitou and went to Cotentin, and tarried in the town of Saint-Saviour more than half


a year. And always the prince proceeded on the raising of this fouage, the which if he had brought about should have been well worth every year a twelve hundred thousand franks, every fire to have paid yearly a frank, the rich to have borne out the poor. Now let us return to king Henry, who was all this season in the realm of Aragon, and let us skew how he persevered after. The most part of the state of the prince and of his business was well known with the kings thereabout, as with king Peter of Aragon and with king Henry, for they laid great wait to know it. They understood well how the barons of Gascoyne were gone to Paris to the French king and in a manner began to rebel against the prince, with the which they were nothing displeased, and specially king Henry, for then he thought to attain again to conquer the realm of Castile, the which he had lost by the means of the prince. And so then king Henry took leave of the king of Aragon and departed from the town of Valence the great ; and out of Aragon with him there went the viscount of Roquebertin and the viscount of Roda, and they were three thousand horsemen and six thousand afoot, with a certain Genoways that they had in wages. And so they rode toward Spain till they came to the city of Burgos, the which incontinent was opened and rendered up to king Henry, and they received him as their lord ; and from thence he went to the Vale Olive, for king Henry understood that the king of Mallorca was still there. And when they of the town of Vale Olive understood that they of Burgos had yielded up their town to king Henry, then they thought not to keep their town against him, and so yielded them to him and received him as their lord. As soon as the king was entered into the town, he demanded where the king of Mallorca was, the which was shewed him. Then the king entered into the chamber where he lay, not fully whole of his disease. Then the king went to him and said: ` Sir king of Mallorca, ye have been our enemy, and with a great army ye have invaded this our realm of Castile. Wherefore we set our hands on you ; therefore yield yourself as our prisoner, or else ye are but dead.' And when the king of Mallorca saw himself in that case and that no defence




Page 185 (Chronicles of Froissart)