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Page 183 (Chronicles of Froissart)



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country and suffer the prince's people to return and pass peaceably without any let of any of the country, paying courteously for that they took. Then came to the prince the king of Navarre and sit Martin de la Carra, when they saw the matter go in such wise between the king of Aragon and the prince ; and they made to the prince all the honour that they could devise and offered passage for him and for his dear brother the duke of Lancaster and for divers other knights of England and of Gascoyne ; hut in any wise he would that the companions should take their way by some other passage and not through Navarre. Then the prince and his lords, when they saw that the way through Navarre was more meet and necessary for them than through Aragon, thought not to refuse the king of Navarre's offer, but so thanked him greatly. Thus the prince passed through the realm of Navarre, and the king and sir Martin de la Carra conveyed him till they came to the passage of Roncesvaulx, and so from thence they passed by their journeys till they came to the city of Bayonne, where he was received with great joy. And there the prince refreshed him four days, and then departed and rode to Bordeaux, where he was also received with great solemnity ; and my lady the princess met him with her young son Edward, who as then was of the age of three years. Then departed the lords and men of war one from another, and the lords of Gascoyne went home to their own houses, and the companions came also into the principality, abiding for their wages. The prince was much hound to them and promised to pay them to his power, as soon as he had money: though king don Peter kept not his promise with him, yet he said they should not bear the loss thereof, sith they had so well served him. And king Henry the bastard, who was in the garrison of Bagneres in Bigorre, then he departed thence with such men of war as he had and went into Aragon to the king there, who loved him entirely and joyously received him, and there tarried all the winter and there made a new alliance between him and the king of Aragon and promised to make war against king don Peter. And the Bretons that were in their company, as sir Arnold Limousin, sir Geoffrey Richon and sir Yon de Laconet, rode to the passages of Spain and made war for king Henry' Now let us speak of the deliverance of sir Bertram of Guesclin. After that the prince of Wales was returned into Acquitaine and his brother the duke of Lancaster into England and every lord into his own, sir Bertram of Guesclin was still prisoner with the prince and with sir John Chandos and could not come to his ransom nor finance, the which was sore displeasant to king Henry, if he might have mended it : and so it fortuned after, as I was informed, that on a day the prince called to him sir Bertram of Guesclin and demanded of him how he did. He answered and said: `Sir, it was never better with me. It is reason that it should so be, for I am in prison with the most renowned knight of the world.' ` With whom is that ?' said the prince. ` Sir,' quoth he, ` that is with sir John Chandos; and, sir, it is said in the realm of France and in other places that ye fear me so much, that ye dare not let me out of prison ; the which to me is full great honour.' The prince, who understood well the words of sir Bertram of Guesclin and perceived well how his own council would in no wise that he should deliver him unto the time that king don Peter had paid him all such sums as he was bound to do, then he said to sir Bertram : `Sir, then ye think that we keep you for fear of your chivalry. Nay, think it not, for I swear by Saint George it is not so. Therefore pay for your ransom a hundred thousand franks and ye shall he delivered.' Sir Bertram, who desired greatly to he delivered and heard on what point he might depart, took the prince with that word and said: `Sir, in the name of God so be it: I will pay no less.' And when the prince heard him say so, he would then gladly have repented himself, and also some of his council came to him and said, `Sir, ye have not done w



Page 183 (Chronicles of Froissart)