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and by semblant he right joyously received them. These knights did their message as they had in charge by their lord the prince. Then the king answered them in excusing of himself and said: ` Sirs, certainly it greatly displeaseth us that we cannot keep the promise that we have made with our cousin the prince, the which we have oftentimes shewed unto our people here in these parts; but our people excuseth themselves and saith how they can make no sum of money as long as the companions be in the country, for they have three or four times robbed our treasurers, who were coming to our cousin the prince with our money. Therefore we require you to shew our cousin from us, that we require him that he will withdraw and put out of this our realm these evil people of the companions, and that he do leave there some of his own knights, to whom in the name of him we will pay and deliver such sums of money as he desireth of us and as we are bound to pay him.' This was all the answer that these knights could have of him at that time, and so they departed and went again to the prince their lord, and then recounted to him and to his council all that they had heard and seen ; with the which answer the prince was much more displeased than he was before, for he saw well how that king don Peter failed of his promise and varied from reason. The same season that the prince thus abode in the Vale of Olives, whereas he had been more than the space of four months, nigh all the summer, the king of Mallorca fell sick sore diseased and lay sick in his bed. Then there was put to ransom sir Arnold d'Audrehem, the Begue of Villaines, and divers other knights and squires of France and of Bretayne, who were taken at Nazres and exchanged for sir Thomas Felton and for sir Richard Tanton and for sir Hugh Hastings and divers other. But sir Bertram of Guesclin abode still as prisoner with the prince, for the Englishmen counselled the prince and said that if he delivered sir Bertram of Guesclin, he would make him greater war than ever he had done before with the helping of the bastard Henry, who as then was in Bigorre and had taken the town of Bagneres, and made great war in that quarter. Therefore sir Bertram of Guesclin was not delivered at that time. When that the prince of Wales heard the excusations of king don Peter, then he was much more displeased than he was before, and demanded counsel in that behalf of his people, who desired to return home, for they bare with full great trouble the heat and the infective air of the country of Spain, and also the prince himself was not very well at ease, and therefore his people counselled him to return again, saying how king don Peter had greatly failed him to his blame and great dishonour. Then it was shewed openly that every man should return. And when the prince should remove, he sent to the king of Mallorca sir Hugh Courtenay and sir John Chandos, shewing him how the prince would depart out of Spain, desiring him to take advice if he would depart or not, for the prince would be loath to leave him behind. Then the king of Mallorca said: `Sirs, I thank greatly the prince, but at this present time I cannot ride nor remove till it please God.' Then the knights said: `Sir, will you that my lord the prince shall leave with you a certain number of men, to wait and conduct you when ye be able to ride?' `Nay surely, sir,' quoth the king, 'it shall not need, for I know not how long it will be or I be able to ride.' And so they departed and returned to the prince, shewing him what they had done. ` Well,' said the prince, 'as it please God and him, so be it.' Then the prince departed and all his company, and went to a city called Madrigal, and there he rested in the vale called Soria between Aragon and Spain. And there he tarried a month, for there were certain passages closed against him in the marches of Aragon. And it was said in the host that the king of Navarre, who was newly returned out of prison, was agreed with the bastard of Spain and with the king of Aragon to let the prince's passage ; but yet he did nothing,



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