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against him, but every man to him obeisant, then the prince said to him : `Sir king, ye are now, thanked be God, peaceably king of this your own realm without any rebellion or let : and, sir, I and my company tarry here at a great charge and expense. Therefore we require you to provide for money to ay the wages to them that hath holpen to ring you again into your realm and in fulfilling of your promise, whereunto ye have sworn and sealed. And, sir, the shortlier that ye do it, the greater thank we shall give you and the more shall be your profit; for ye know well men of war must be paid to live withal, or else they will take it whereas they may get it.' Then the king answered and said: `Cousin, we will hold, keep and accomplish to our power that we have sworn and sealed unto. But, sir, as for this present time we have no money ; wherefore we will draw us to the marches of Seville, and there we will so procure for money that we will satisfy every party. And, sir, ye shall abide still here in the Vale of Olives,' the which is a plentiful country ; and, sir, we shall return again to you in as short time as we conveniently can or may, and at the farthest by Whitsuntide.' This answer was right pleasant to the prince and to his council ; and shortly after the king don Peter departed from the prince and rode toward Seville to the intent to get money to pay his men of war, as he had promised. And the prince went and lodged in the Vale of Olives, and all his lords and people spread abroad in the country, to get victuals more plentiful for them and for their horses. There thus they sojourned to a small profit to the country, for the companions could not abstain themselves from robbing and pilling of the country.

CHAPTER CCXXXIX

Of the honour that was given to the prince for the victory of Spain, and how king Henry came into France to make war on the prince's land, and of the answer that king don Peter sent to the prince, and how the prince departed out of Spain and came into France.

TIDINGS spread abroad through France, England, Almaine and other countries how

1 Valladolid, which Froissart calls Val-d'Olif.

the prince of Wales and his puissance had in battle discomfited king Henry, and taken, slain and drowned of his men the day of the battle more than a hundred thousand men, whereby the prince was greatly renowned and his chivalry and high enterprise much praised in all places that heard thereof, and specially in the Empire of Almaine and in the realm of England ; for the Almains, Flemings and Englishmen said that the prince of Wales was chief flower of all chivalry, and how that such' a prince was well worthy to govern all the world, sith by his prowess he had achieved such three high enterprises as he had done ; first, the battle of Crecy in Ponthien, the second ten year after at Poitiers, and the third now in Spain before Nazres : so in England in the city of London. the burgesses there made great solemnity and triumph for that victory, as they anciently were wont to do for kings, when they had overcome their enemies. And in the realm of France there were made lamentable sorrows for the loss of the good knights of the realm of France, the whichwereslain at tha tjourney, andspecially there was made sorrow for sir Bertram of Guesclin and for sir Arnold d'Audrehem, who were taken prisoners, and divers other, who were kept right courteously, and some of them put to finance and ransom, but not sir Bertram of Guesclin so soon; for sir John Chandos, who had the rule of him, would not deliver him, and also sir Bertram made no great suit therefor. Now let us somewhat speak of king Henry, what he did when he departed from the battle; and then let us return again to the prince and to king don Peter of Castile. King Henry, as it is said hereafter, saved himself as well as he might and withdrew from his enemies, and led his wife and his children as soon as he might into the city of Valence in Aragon, whereas the king of Aragon was, who was his godfather and friend, and to him recounted all his adventure. And anon af



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