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there acquitted themselves nobly : for of truth, if the Spaniards had done their part as well as the Frenchmen did, the Englishmen and Gascons should have had much more to do and have suffered more pain than they did. The fault was not in king Henry that they did no better, for he had well admonished and desired them to have done their devoir valiantly, and so they had promised him to have done. The king bare himself right valiantly, and did marvels in arms, and with good courage comforted his people, as, when they were flying and opening, he came in among them and said: `Lords, I am your king: ye have made me king of Castile, and have sworn and promised that to die ye will not fail me. For God's sake keep your promise that ye have sworn, and acquit you against me, and I shall acquit me against you ; for I shall not fly one foot as long as I may see you do your devoir.' By these words and such other full of comfort king Henry brought his men together again three times the same day, and with his own hands he fought valiantly, so that he ought greatly to be honoured and renowned. This was a marvellous dangerous battle, and many a man slain and sore hurt. The commons of Spain according to the usage of their country with their slings they did cast stones with great violence and did much hurt, the which at the beginning troubled greatly the Englishmen: but when their cast was past and that they felt the sharp arrows light among them, they could no longer keep their array. With king Henry in his battle were many noble men of arms, as well of Spain as of Lisbon, of Aragon and of Portugal, who acquitted them right nobly and gave it not up so lightly, for valiantly they fought with spears, javelins, archegayes and swords ; and on the wing of king Henry's battle there were certain well mounted, who always kept the battle in good order, for if the battle opened or brake array in any side, then they were ever ready to help to bring them again into good order. So these Englishmen and Gascons, or they had the advantage, they bought it dearly, and won it by noble chivalry and great prowess of arms: and for to say truth, the prince himself was the chief flower of chivalry of all the world, and had with him N as then right noble and valiant knights and squires : and a little beside the prince's battle was the king of Mallorca and his company, fighting and acquitting themselves right valiantly, and also there was the lord Martin de la Carra representing the king of Navarre, who did right well his devoir. I cannot speak of all them that did that day right nobly; but about the prince in his battle there were divers good knights, as well of England as of Gascoyne, as sir Richard Pontchardon, sir Thomas Spenser, sir Thomas Holland, sir Niel Loring, sir Hugh and sir Philip Courtenay, sir John Trivet, sir Nicholas Bond, sir Thomas Trivet, and divers other, as the seneschal of Saintonge, sir Baldwin of Freville, the seneschal of Bordeaux, of Rochelle, of Poitou, of Angouleme, of Rouergue, of Limousin and of Perigord, and sir Louis Melval, sir Raimond Mareuil and divers other. There was none that fained to fight valiantly, and also they had good cause why ; for there were of Spaniards and of Castile more than a hundred thousand men in harness, so that by reason of their great number it was long or they could be overcome. King don Peter was greatly chafed, and much desired to meet with the bastard his brother, and said : 'Where is that whoreson that calleth himself king of Castile?' And the same king Henry fought right valiantly whereas he was, and held his people together right marvellously, and said: ` Ah ! ye good people, ye have crowned me king, therefore help and aid me to keep the heritage that you have given me.' So that by these words and such other as he spake that day he caused many to be right hardy and valiant, whereby they abode on the field, so that because of their honour they would not fly from the place.

CHAPTER CCXXXVIII How sir Bertram of Guesclin was discomfited, he taken and- king Henry saved himself, and of the Spaniards



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