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Page 175 (Chronicles of Froissart)



page 175


There the battle began to be fierce and cruel on all parts, for the Spaniards and Castilians had slings, wherewith they cast stones in such wise, that therewith they clave and brake many a bassenet and helm and hurt many a man and overthrew them to the earth ; and the archers of England shot fiercely and hurt [the] Spaniards grievously and brought them to great mischief. The one -part cried, ` Castile for king Henry!' and the other part, `Saint George, Guyenne !' And the first battle, as the duke of Lancaster and sir john Chandos and the two, marshals sir Guichard d'Angle and sir Stephen Cosington, fought with sir Bertram of Guesclin and with the other knights of France and of Aragon. There was done many a deed of arms, so it was hard for any of them to open other's battle. Divers of them held their spears in both their hands, foining and pressing each at other, and some fought with short swords and daggers. Thus at the beginning the Frenchmen and they of Aragon fought valiantly, so that the good knights of England endured much pain. That day sir John Chandos was a good knight and did under his banner many a noble feat of arms. He adventured himself so far, that he was closed in among his enemies and so sore overpressed that he was felled down to the earth ; and on him there fell a great and big man of Castile called Martin Ferrant, who was greatly renowned of hardiness among the Spaniards, and he did his intent to have slain sir John Chandos, who lay under him in great clanger. Then sir John Chandos remembered of a knife that he had in his bosom and drew it out and strake this Martin so in the back and in the sides that he wounded him to death, as he lay on him. Then sir John Chandos turned him over and rose quickly on his feet, and his men were there about him, who had with much pain broken the press to come to him, whereas they saw him felled. The Saturday in the morning between Nazres and Navaret was the battle right fell and cruel, and many a man brought to great mischief. There was done many a noble deed of arms by the prince and by the duke of Lancaster his brother and by sir John Chandos, sir Guichard d'Angle, the captal of Buch, the lord of Clisson, the lord of Retz, sir Hugh Calverley, sir Matthew Gournay, sir Louis Harcourt, the lord of Pons, the lord of Partenay ; and of Gascons fought valiantly the earl of Armagnac, the lord d'Albret, the lord of Pommiers and his brethren, the lord of Mussidan, the lord of Rauzan, the earl of Perigord, the earl of Comminges, the earl of Caraman, the lord of Condom, the lord Lesparre, the lord of Caumont, sir Bertram of Terride, the lord of Puycornet, sir Bernard d'Albret, the lord of Geronde, sir Aymery of Tastes, the soudic of Latrau, sir Petiton of Curton, and divers other knights and squires acquitted themselves right nobly in arms to their powers: and under the pennon of Saint George and the banner of sir John Chandos were all the companions, to the number of twelve hundred pensels,1 and they were right hardy and valiant knights, as sir Robert Cheyne, sir Perducas d' Albret, Robert Briquet, sir Garsis of the Castle, sir Gaillard Vigier, sir John Creswey, Naudan of Bageran, Aymenion d'Artigue, Perrot of Savoy, the bourg Camus, the bourg Les. parre, the bourg Breteuil, Espiote and divers other. On the French party sir Bertram of Guesclin, sir Arnold d'Audrehem, Sancho, sir Gomez Carillo and other knights of France and of Aragon fought right nobly to their powers. Howbeit they had none advantage, for these companions were hardy and strong knights and well used and expert in arms, and also there were great plenty of knights and squires of England tinder the banner of the duke of Lancaster and of sir John Chandos. There was the lord William Beauchamp, son to the earl of Warwick, sir Ralph Camoys, sir Walter Urswick, sir Thomas Dammery, sir John Grandison, sir John d'Ypres,2 sir Amery of Rochechouart, sir Gaillard de la Motte, and more than two hundred knights, the which I cannot name. And to speak truly, the said sir Bertram du Guesclin and the marshal d'Audrehem, the Begue



Page 175 (Chronicles of Froissart)