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for he knew well he should encounter his enemies. So there were none that went ' before the marshals' battles but such currours as were appointed : so thus the lords of both hosts knew by the report of their currours that they should shortly meet. So they went forward an hosting pace each toward other, and when the sun was rising up, it was a great beauty to behold the battles and the armours shining against the sun. So thus they went forward till they approached near together : then the prince and his company went over a little hill, and in the descending thereof they perceived clearly their enemies coming toward them. And when they were all descended down _ this mountain, then every man drew to their battles and kept them still and so rested them, and every man dressed and apparelled himself ready to fight. Then sir John Chandos brought his banner rolled up together to the prince, and said : `Sir, behold here is my banner: I require you display it abroad and give me leave this day to raise it; for, sir, I thank God and you, I have land and heritage sufficient to maintain it withal.' Then the prince and king don Peter took the banner between their hands and spread it abroad, the which was of silver, a sharp pile gules, and de' livered it to him and said: `Sir John, behold here your banner. God send you joy and honour thereof.' Then sir John Chandos bare his banner to his own company and said: `Sirs, behold here my banner and yours : keep it as your own.' And they took it and were right joyful thereof, and said that by the pleasure of God and Saint George they would keep and defend it to the best of their powers ; and so the banner abode in the hands of a good English squire called William Alery, who bare it that day and acquitted himself right nobly. Then anon after, the Englishmen and Gascons alighted off their horses and every man drew under their own banner and standard in array of battle ready to fight. It was great joy to see and consider the banners and pennons and the noble armoury 1 that was there. Then the battles began a little to advance, and then the prince of Wales opened his eyen and regarded toward heaven, and joined his hands together and 1 i.e. Display of arms on banners and pennons. said: `Very God, Jesu Christ,' who bath formed and created me, consent by your benign grace that I may have this day victory of mine enemies, as that I do is in a rightful quarrel, to sustain and to aid this king chased out of his own heritage, the which giveth me courage to advance myself to re-establish him again into his realm.' And then he laid his right hand on king don Peter, who was by him, and said ` Sir king, ye shall know this day if ever ye shall have any part of the realm of Castile or not. Therefore advance banners, in the name of God. and Saint George.' With those words the duke of Lancaster and sir John Chandos approached, and the duke said to sir William Beauchamp : ` Sir William, behold yonder our enemies. This day ye shall see me a good knight, or else to die in the quarrel.' And therewith they approached their enemies. And first the duke of Lancaster and sir John Chandos' battle assembled with the battle of sir Bertram of Guesclin and of the marshal sir Arnold d'Audrehem, who were a four thousand men of arms. So at the first brunt there was a sore encounter with spears and shields, and they were a certain space or any of them could get within other. There was many a deed of arms done and many a man reversed and cast to the earth, that never after was relieved. And when these two first battles were thus assembled, the other battles would not long tarry behind, but approached and assembled together quickly. And so the prince and his battle came on the earl Sancho's battle, and with the prince was king don Peter of Castile and sir Martin de la Carra, who represented the king of Navarre. And at the first meeting that the prince met with the earl Sancho's battle, the earl and his brother fled.away without order or good array, and wist not why, and a two thousand spears with him. So this second battle was ope



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