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Page 170 (Chronicles of Froissart)



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the earl don Tello brother to the king don Henry was certainly informed that there were men of war in garrison in the town of Navaret, wherefore he thought to go and see them more nearer. But first on a day the knights of England rode out of Navaret in an evening so far forth, that they came to king Henry's lodging and made there a great skirmish and marvellously awoke the host and slew and tools divers, and specially the knight that kept the watch was taken without recovery, and so returned again to Navaret without any damage. And the next day they sent to the prince an herald, who was as then at Sauveterre, signifying him what they had done and seen, and what puissance his enemies were of, and where they were lodged ; for they knew all this well by the information of such prisoners as they had taken. Of these tidings the prince was right joyous, in that his knights had so well borne themselves on the frontier of his enemies. King Henry, who was right sore displeased that the Englishmen that lay at Navaret had thus escried his host, said how he would approach nearer to his enemies, and so advanced forward. And when sir Thomas Felton and his company at Navaret knew that king Henry was passed the water and drew forward to find the prince, then they determined to depart from Navaret and to take the fields and to know more certainty of the Spaniards. And so they did, and sent word to the prince how that king Henry approached fast, and by seeming desiring greatly to find him and his men. And the prince, who was as then at Sauveterre, when he understood that king Henry was passed the water and took his way to come to fight with him, he was right joyous, and said a-high that every man heard him : 'By my faith this bastard Henry is a valiant knight and a hardy, for it is sign of great prowess that he seeketh thus for us ; and sith he doth so and we in like wise him, by all reason we ought to meet and fight together. Therefore it were good that we departed from hence, and go forward, and to get Vittoria, or our enemies come there.' And so the next morning they departed from Sauveterre, first the prince and all his battle, and he did so much that he came before Vittoria, and there he found sir Thomas Felton and the foresaid knights, to whom he made great cheer and demanded them of divers things. And as they were devising together, their currours came and reported that they had seen the currours of their enemies, wherefore they knew for certain that king Henry and his host was not far off by reason of the demeaning that they had seen among the Spaniards. When the prince understood these tidings, he caused his trumpets to sown and cried alarum throughout all the host. And when every man heard that, then they drew to their order and array and ranged them in battle ready to fight ; for every man knew, or he departed from Sauveterre, what he should do and what order to take, the which they did incontinent. There might have been seen great nobleness, and banners and pennons beaten with arms waving in the wind. What should I say more? It was great nobleness to behold. The vaward was so well ranged that it was marvel to behold, whereof the duke of Lancaster was chief and with him sir John Chandos constable of Acquitaine with a great company, and in those battles there were made divers new knights. The duke of Lancaster in the vaward made new knights, as sir Ralph Camoys, sir Walter Urswick, sir Thomas Dammery, sir John Grandison and other to the number of twelve ; and sir John Chandos made (livers English squires knights, as Cotton, Clinton, Prior, William of Faringdon, Amery of Rochechouart; Gaillard de la Motte and Robert Briquet. The prince made first knight don Peter king of Spain, sir Thomas Holland, son to his wife the princess, sir Hugh, sir Philip and sir Peter Courtenay, sir John Trivet and Nicholas Bond and divers other: and in like wise so did divers other lords in their battles. There were made that day three hundred new knights or more, and all that day they were still ready ranged in the battle to abide for their enemies,



Page 170 (Chronicles of Froissart)