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captain of that enterprise ; and in his company was sir William Felton his brother, sir Thomas du Fort, sir Robert Knolles, sir Gaillard Vigier, sir Ralph Hastings, sir d'Aghorisses and divers other knights and squires ; and they were a seven score, and three hundred archers, all well horsed and good men of arms. And also there was sir Hugh Stafford, sir Richard Tanton and sir Simon Burley, who ought not to be forgotten. These men of arms rode through Navarre by such guides as they had and came to the river of Ebro, the which is rude and deep; and so they passed and lodged in a village called Navaret : there they held themselves, the better to know and hear where king Henry was. In the mean season, while these knights thus lodged at Navaret and the prince in the marches of Pampelone, the same time the king of Navarre was taken prisoner, as he rode from one town to another, by the French party by sir Oliver of Mauny, whereof the prince and all his part had great marvel. And some in the prince's host supposed it was done by a cautel by his own means, because he would convey the prince no further nor go in his company, because he knew not how the matter should go between king Henry and king don Peter. Howbeit, the queen his wife was thereof sore dismayed and discomforted, and came and kneeled on her knees before the prince and said : ` Dear sir, for God's sake have mercy and intend on the deliverance of the king my husband, who is taken fraudulently and as yet cannot be known how. Therefore, sir, we desire you for the love of God that we may have him again.' Then the prince answered: 'Certainly, fair lady and cousin, his taking to us is right displeasant, and we trust to provide remedy for him shortly. Wherefore we desire you to comfort yourself; for this our viage once achieved, we shall intend to no other thing but for his deliverance.' Then the queen of Navarre returned. And there was a noble knight, sir Martin Carra, who undertook to guide the prince through the realm of Navarre, and did get him guides for his people : for otherwise they could not have kept the right way through the straits and perilous passage. So thus the prince departed from thence, thereas he was lodged, and he and his company passed through a place named Sarris,1 the which was right perilous to pass, for it was narrow and an evil way. There were many sore troubled for lack of victual, for they found but little in that passage till they came to Sauveterre. Sauveterre is a good town and is in a good country and a plentiful, as to the marches thereabout. This town is at the utter bounds of Navarre and on the entering into Spain. This town held with king Henry. So then the prince's host spread abroad that country, and the companions advanced themselves to assail the town of Sauveterre and to take it by force and to rob and pill it, whereunto they had great desire because of the great riches that they knew was within the town, the which they of the country had brought thither on trust of the strength of the town. But they of the town thought not to abide that peril, for they knew well they could not long endure nor resist against so great an host. Therefore they came out and rendered themselves to king don Peter, and cried him mercy and presented to him the keys of the town. The king don Peter by counsel of the prince took them to mercy ; or else he would not have done it, for by his will he would have destroyed them all howbeit, they were all received to mercy, and the prince, king don Peter and the king of Mallorca with the duke of Lan caster entered into the town, and the earl of Armagnac and all other lodged thereabout in villages. Now let us leave the prince there, and somewhat speak of his men that were at the town of Navaret. The foresaid knights that were there greatly desired to advance their bodies ; for they were a five days' journey from their own host, whereas they departed from them first. And oftentimes they issued out of Navaret and rode to the marches of their enemies, to learn what their enemies intended. And this king Henry was lodg



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