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Page 167 (Chronicles of Froissart)



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the constable of Acquitaine sir John Chandos, who had twelve hundred pennons of his arms, the field silver, a sharp pile gules, and with him was the two marshals of Acquitaine, as sir Guichard d'Angle and sir Stephen Cosington, and with them was the pennon of Saint George. There was also sir William Beauchamp, son to the earl of Warwick, sir Hugh Hastings, and the lord Nevill, who served sir John Chandos with thirty spears in that viage at his own charge because of the taking of the battle of Au ray ; 1 and also there was the lord d''Aubeterre, sir Garsis of the Castle, sir Richard of Tanton, sir Robert Cheyne, sir Robert Briquet, John Creswey, Amery of the Rochechouart, Gaillard of la Motte, William of Clifton, Willekos the Butler and Penneriel. All these were there with their pennons under sir John Chandos' rule they were to the number of ten thousand horses, and all these passed the Monday, as is before said. The Tuesday passed the prince of Wales and king don Peter, and also the king of Navarre, who was come again to the prince to bear him company and to ensign him the ready passage. And with the prince there was sir Louis of Harcourt, the viscount of Chatelleraut, the viscount of Rochechouart, the lord of Partenay, the lord of Poyane, the lord of Tannay-Bouton, and all the Poitevins, sir Thomas Felton, great seneschal of Acquitaine, sir William his brother, sir Eustace d'Aubrecicourt, the seneschal of Saintonge, the seneschal of Rochelle, the seneschal of Quercy, the seneschal of Limousin, the seneschal of Agenois, the seneschal of Bigorre, sir Richard of Pontchardon, sir Niel Loring, sir d'Aghorisses, sir Thomas Banaster, sir Louis of Melval, sir Raymond of Mareuil, the lord of Pierrebuffiere, and to the number of four thousand men of arms, and they were a ten thousand horses. The same Tuesday they had evil passage because of wind and snow: howbeit they passed forth and lodged in the county of Pampelone, and the king of Navarre brought the prince and the king don Peter into the city of Pampelone to supper and made them great cheer. 1 That is, in quittance of his ransom, because made prisoner at Auray ; but it was not the lord de Neufville of whom this should be said, but the lord de Retz, whose name has dropped out. The Wednesday passed the king James of Mallorca and the earl of Armagnac, the earl d'Albret his nephew, sir Bernard d'Albret, lord of Geronde, the earl of Perigord, the viscount of Caraman, the earl of Comminges, the captal of Buch, the lord of Clisson, the three brethren of Pommiers, sir John, sir Elie and sir Aymenion, the lord of Caumont, the lord of Mussidan, sir Robert Knolles, the lord Lesparre, the lord of Condom, the lord of Rauzan, sir Petiton of Curton, sir Aymery of Tastes, the lord de la Barthe, sir Bertram of Tastes, the lord of Puycornet, sir Thomas of Winstanley, sir Perducas d'Albret, the bourg of Breteuil, Naudan of Bageran, Bernard de la Salle, Ortingo, l'Amit and all the other of the companions, and they were a ten thousand horse. They had more easy passage than those that passed the day before ; and so all the whole host lodged in the county of Pampelone, abiding each other, refreshing them and their horses. They lay still thus about Pampelone the space of three days, because they found the country plentiful both in flesh, bread, wine and all other purveyances for them and for their horses. Howbeit these companions paid not for everything, as was demanded of them, nor they could not abstain from robbing and pilling that they could get; so that about Pampelone and in the way they did much trouble and hurt, wherewith the king of Navarre was right sore displeased, but he could not as then amend it : but he repented him oftentimes that he had opened his passages to the prince and to his company, for he perceived well how he had thereby more hurt than profit. Howbeit the season was not then for him to say all that he thought, for he saw well and considered that he was not as then master of his own country. So he had daily great complaints made to him of one and other of his country, wher



Page 167 (Chronicles of Froissart)