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day of December.' These letters, sealed with the prince's great seal, were sent to the lord d'Albret, who was in his own country right busy to prepare him toward this viage, for it was said that the prince should depart shortly. When he saw the prince's letters, he opened them and read them two times over, the better to understand them, for he had great marvel of that he had found written in them, and was in his mind marvellously displeased, and said How is it that my lord the prince japeth and mocketh thus with me, sith he would that I should give leave to depart eight hundred spears, knights and squires, whom by his commandment I have retained and have let them of their profit divers other ways.' And incontinent in that displeasure he called for his clerk and caused him to write a letter to the prince in this manner: `Dear sir, I am greatly marvelled of the letters ye have sent me; and, sir, I cannot well find nor take counsel how I ought or can answer you in that behalf, for it turneth to my great prejudice and blame, and to all my company, whom I have by your own ordinance and commandment retained, and they are all ready apparelled to do you service, and I have letted them of taking their profit in other places, whereas they might have had it ; for some of them were determined to have gone over the sea into Pruce, to Constantine, and to Jerusalem, as all knights and squires doth, to advance themselves. Sir, they have great marvel and are sore displeased that they should thus be put out, and in like wise I have great marvel thereof and in what manner I have deserved it. Dear sir, please it you to know, I cannot assure you of any of them divided from their company. I am the least and worst of them all: if any depart, I am in surety they will all depart. God keep you in his safe-guard. Written,' etc. When the prince heard this answer, he took it of great presumption, and so did divers knights of England that were there of his council. Then the prince shook his head and said in English, as I was informed, for I was then in Bordeaux: ` Ah,' said the prince, `the lord d'Albret is a great master in my country, when he will break the ordinance that is devised by my council. By God it shall not go as he weeneth. Let him abide, an he will, for without his thousand spears I trust to God I shall furnish my viage.' Then certain knights of England that were there said : ` Sir, ye know full little the minds of these Gascons, nor how proud they be, nor they love us but little nor never did. Sir, remember ye not how highly and greatly they bare themselves against you in the city of Bordeaux, when that king John of France was first brought thither? They said then and maintained plainly that by them all only ye attained to achieve that viage in taking of the king. And that right well appeared ; for ye were in great treaty with them the space of four months, or they would consent that the French king should be carried into England. First it behoved you to satisfy their minds, to keep them in love.' And at those words the prince held his peace, howbeit his thought was never the less. This was the first occasion of the hatred that was after between the prince and the lord d'Albret. Thus the lord d'Albret was in great peril ; for the prince was high and of great courage and cruel in his heart, for he would other by right or wrong that every lord under his commandment should hold of him. But the earl of Armagnac, uncle to the said lord d'Albret, when he heard of this displeasure between the prince and the lord d'Albret his nephew, then he came to Bordeaux to the prince, and sir John Chandos and sir Thomas Felton with him, by whose counsel the prince was much ordered: and so by their good means the prince's displeasure was appeased, so that the lord d'Albret should bring no more but two hundred spears; with the which he was nothing joyous, nor yet his people, nor never after he loved so entirely the prince as he did before. Howbeit there was no remedy but to bear and pass over his trouble as well as he might. Thus, while the prince was m



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