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to the number of twelve thousand fighting men, and greatly it was to his cost to retain them. And after he had them, he sustained and bare their charges, or they departed out of the principality, from the beginning of August to the beginning of February; and beside that the prince received and retained all manner of men of war, wheresoever he could get them. And also the foresaid king Henry retained men of war in every part out of the realm of France and other places, and they came to serve him because of the alliances that were between the French king and him ; and also he had with him retained some of the companions Bretons, such as were favourable to sir Bertram of Guesclin, as sir Silvester Bude, Alain of Saint-Pol, William of Breuil, and Alain of Laconet, all these were captains of those companions. And the prince might have had also with him many strangers men of war, as Flemings, Almains and Brabances, if he had list; but he sent home again many of them, for he had rather have had of his own subjects of the principality than strangers. Also there came to him a great aid out of England; for when the king of England his father knew that this viage went forward, then he gave licence to one of his sons, duke John of Lancaster, to go to the prince of Wales his brother with a great number of men of war, as four hundred men of arms and four hundred archers. And when the prince knew of his brother's coming, he was thereof right joyous. In the same season came to the prince to Bordeaux James king of Mallorca, so he called himself, but he had in possession nothing of the realm, for the king of Aragon kept it from him by force and had slain in prison the king of Mallorca in a city called Barcelone. Therefore this young king James, to revenge the death of his father and to recover his heritage, was fled out of his own realm to the prince ; and he had married the queen of Naples. The prince made him great cheer and greatly comforted him ; and when the king had shewed the prince all the reasons and occasions of his coming, and perceived the wrong that the king of Aragon had done to him., as in keeping from him his inheritance, and also slain his father, then the prince said : ` Sir king, I promise you faithfully that after my return out of Spain I shall intend to set you again into your heritage other by treaty or by force.' This promise pleased greatly the king, and so he tarried still with the prince in Bordeaux abiding his departing as other did. And the prince, to do him more honour, caused to be delivered to him all that was for him necessary, because he was a stranger and of a far country, and had not there of his own after his appetite. And daily there came great complaints to the prince of the companions; how they did much hurt to men and women of the country where they lay, so that the people of that marches would gladly that the prince should advance forth in his viage, to the which the prince was right desirous. Howbeit, he was counselled that he should suffer the feast of Christmas first to pass, to the intent that they might have winter at their backs; to the which counsel the prince inclined, and somewhat because the princess his wife was great with child, who took much thought for his departing ; wherefore the prince would gladly see her delivered or he departed, and she on her part was gladder to have him abide. All this mean season there was great provision made for this viage, because they should enter into a realm where they should find but small provision ; and while they thus sojourned at Bordeaux, and that all the country was full of men of war, the prince kept oftentimes great council ; and among other things, as I was informed, the lord d'Albret was countermanded with his thousand spears, and a letter was sent to him from the prince containing thus : ` Sir d'Albret, sith it is so that we have taken on us by our voluntary will this viage, the which we intend shortly to proceed, considering our great business, charges and diseases that we have, as well by strangers, such as entered into our service, as by



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