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king don Peter sped with the prince his cousin, whom he found right amiable and courteous, and well condescended to his desires: howbeit, there were some of his council said unto him as ye shall hear after. Or that don Peter came to Bordeaux, some wise and sage imaginative lords, as well of Gascoyne as of England, who were of the prince's council and had ever truly served him and given him good counsel and so thought ever to do, they said to the prince : ` Sir, ye have heard say divers times, he that too much embraceth holdeth the weaklier. It is for a truth that ye are one of the princes of the world most praised, honoured and redoubted, and holdeth on this side the sea great lands and seignories, thanked be God, in good rest and peace. There is no king, near nor far off, as at this present time, that dare displease you, ye are so renowned of good chivalry, grace and good fortune : ye ought therefore by reason to be content with that ye have and seek not to get you any enemies. Sir, we say not this for none evil: we know well the king don Peter of Castile, who is now driven out of his realm, is a man of high mind, right cruel and full of evil conditions ; for by him bath been done many evil deeds in the realm of Castile, and bath caused many a valiant man to lose his head and brought cruelly to an end without any manner of reason: and so by his villain deeds and consent he is now deceived' and put out of his realm, and also beside all this he is enemy to the Church and cursed by our holy father the pope. He is reputed, and bath been a great season, like a tyrant, and without title of reason bath always grieved and made war with his neighbours, the king of Aragon and the Icing of Navarre, and would have disherited them by puissance ; and also, as the bruit runneth throughout his realm and by his own men, how he caused to die his wife your cousin, daughter to the duke of Bourbon. Wherefore, sir, ye ought to think and consider that all this that he now suffereth are rods and strokes of God sent to chastise him and to give ensample to all other Christian kings and princes to beware that they do not as he bath done.' With such words or ' The French is `deceu' (for `decheu'), `fallen,' which the translator has confused with `deceu' from ` decevoir.' semblable the prince was counselled, or king don Peter arrived at Bayonne ; but to these words the prince answered thus, saying: `Lords, I think and believe certainly that ye counsel me truly to the best of your powers. I know well and am well informed of the life and state of this king don Peter, and know well that without number he bath done many evil deeds, whereby now he is deceived.' But the cause present that moveth and giveth us courage to be willing to aid him, is as I shall shew you. It is not convenable that a bastard should hold a realm in heritage, and put out of his own realm his brother, rightful inheritor to the land ; the which thing all kings and kings' sons should in no wise suffer nor consent to, for it is a great prejudice against the state royal : and also beside that, the king my father and this king don Peter bath a great season been allied together by great confederations, wherefore we are bound to aid him in cause that he require and desire us so to do.' Thus the prince was moved in his courage to aid and comfort this king don Peter in his trouble and hesynes. Thus he answered to his council, and they could not remove him out of that purpose, for his mind was ever more and more firmly set on that matter. And when king don Peter of Castile was come to the prince, to the city of Bordeaux, he humbled himself right sweetly to the prince, and offered to him great gifts and profit, in saying that he would make Edward his eldest son king of Galice, and that he would depart to him and to his men great good and riches, the which he had left behind him in the realm of Castile, because he durst not bring it with him ; but this riches was in so sure keeping that none knew where it was but himself: to the which words the knights gave good intent, for Englishmen and Ga



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